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8 Safe Investments for People Who Hate Risking Their Money

Think back to what the stock market looked like to you in March 2020, aka, the apocalypse. Did it look like:

A.) The biggest bargain sale you’ve ever seen in your lifetime? 

or

B.) A burning pit of money that was about to incinerate your life’s savings?

If you answered “B,” you probably have a low risk tolerance. You worry more about losing money than missing out on the opportunity to make more of it.

Being cautious about how you invest your money is a good thing. But if you’re so risk-averse that you avoid investing altogether, you’re putting your money at greater risk than you think.

Do Safe Investments Actually Exist?

When you think about the risks of investing, you probably think about losing principal, i.e., the original amount you invested. If you keep your money in a bank account, there’s virtually no chance of that happening because deposits of up to $250,000 are FDIC insured. 

But consider that the average savings account pays just 0.05% APY, while in 2019, inflation was about 2.3%.

So while you’re not at risk of losing principal, you still face purchasing power risk, which is the risk that your money loses value. Your money needs to earn enough to keep up with inflation to avoid losing purchasing power. If inflation continues at 2.3%, buying $100 worth of groceries will cost you $102.30 a year from now. If you’re saving over decades toward retirement, you’ll be able to buy a whole lot less groceries in your golden years.

There’s also the risk of missed opportunity. By playing it too safe, you’re unlikely to earn the returns you need to grow into a sufficient nest egg.

Though there’s no such thing as a risk-free investment, there are plenty of safe ways to invest your money.

8 Low-Risk Investments for People Who Hate Losing Money

Here are eight options that are good for conservative investors. (Spoiler: Gold, bitcoin and penny stocks did not make our list.

1. CDs

If you have cash you won’t need for a while, investing in a CD, or certificate of deposit, is a good way to earn more interest than you’d get with a regular bank account.

You get a fixed interest rate as long as you don’t withdraw your money before the maturity date. Typically, the longer the duration, the higher the interest rate. 

Since they’re FDIC insured, CDs are among the safest investments in existence. But low risk translates to low rewards. Those low interest rates for borrowers translate to lower APYs for money we save at a bank. Even for five-year CDs, the best APYs are just over 1%.

You also risk losing your interest and even some principal if you need to withdraw money early.

2. Money Market Funds

Not to be confused with money market accounts, money market funds are actually mutual funds that invest in low-risk, short-term debts, such as CDs and U.S. Treasurys. (More on those shortly.)

The returns are often on par with CD interest rates. One advantage: It’s a liquid investment, which means you can cash out at any time. But because they aren’t FDIC insured, they can technically lose principal, though they’re considered extraordinarily safe.

3. Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS)

The U.S. government finances its debt by issuing Treasurys. When you buy Treasurys, you’re investing in bonds backed by the “full faith and credit of the U.S. government.” Unless the federal government defaults on its debt for the first time in history, investors get paid.

The price of that safety: pathetically low yields that often don’t keep up with inflation.

TIPS offer built-in inflation protection — as the name “Treasury Inflation Protected Securities” implies. Available in five-, 10- and 30-year increments, their principal is adjusted based on changes to the Consumer Price Index. The twice-a-year interest payments are adjusted accordingly, as well.

If your principal is $1,000 and the CPI showed inflation of 3%, your new principal is $1,030, and your interest payment is based on the adjusted amount. 

On the flip side, if there’s deflation, your principal is adjusted downward.

4. Municipal Bonds

Municipal bonds, or “munis,” are bonds issued by a state or local government. They’re popular with retirees because the income they generate is tax-free at the federal level. Sometimes when you buy muni bonds in your state, the state doesn’t tax them either.

There are two basic types of munis: General obligation bonds, which are issued for general public works projects, and revenue bonds, which are backed by specific projects, like a hospital or toll road.

General obligation bonds have the lowest risk because the issuing government pledges to raise taxes if necessary to make sure bondholders get paid. With revenue bonds, bondholders get paid from the income generated by the project, so there’s a higher risk of default.

5. Investment-Grade Bonds

Bonds issued by corporations are inherently riskier than bonds issued by governments, because even a stable corporation is at higher risk of defaulting on its debt. But you can mitigate the risks by choosing investment-grade bonds, which are issued by corporations with good to excellent credit ratings.

Because investment-grade bonds are low risk, the yields are low compared to higher-risk “junk bonds.” That’s because corporations with low credit ratings have to pay investors more to compensate them for the extra risk.

6. Target-Date Funds

When you compare bonds vs. stocks, bonds are generally safer, while stocks offer more growth. That’s why as a general rule, your retirement portfolio starts out mostly invested in stocks and then gradually allocates more to bonds.

Target-date funds make that reallocation automatic. They’re commonly found in 401(k)s, IRAs and 529 plans. You choose the date that’s closest to the year you plan to retire or send your child to college. Then the fund gradually shifts more toward safer investments, like bonds and money market funds as that date gets nearer.

7. Total Market ETFs

While having a small percentage of your money in super low-risk investments like CDs,

money market funds and Treasurys is OK, there really is no avoiding the stock market if

you want your money to grow.

If you’re playing day trader, the stock market is a risky place. But when you’re committed to investing in stocks for the long haul, you’re way less exposed to risk. While downturns can cause you to lose money in the short term, the stock market historically ticks upward over time.

A total stock market exchange-traded fund will invest you in hundreds or thousands of companies. Usually, they reflect the makeup of a major stock index, like the Wilshire 5000. If the stock market is up 5%, you’d expect your investment to be up by roughly the same amount. Same goes for if the market drops 5%.

By investing in a huge range of companies, you get an instantly diversified portfolio, which is far less risky than picking your own stocks.

8. Dividend Stocks

If you opt to invest in individual companies, sticking with dividend-paying stock is a smart move. When a company’s board of directors votes to approve a dividend, they’re redistributing part of the profit back to investors.

Dividends are commonly offered by companies that are stable and have a track record of earning a profit. Younger companies are less likely to offer a dividend because they need to reinvest their profits. They have more growth potential, but they’re also a higher risk because they’re less-established.

The best part: Many companies allow shareholders to automatically reinvest their dividends, which means even more compound returns.

Robin Hartill is a certified financial planner and a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder. She writes the Dear Penny personal finance advice column. Send your tricky money questions to [email protected]

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Source: thepennyhoarder.com

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Simple, Achievable New Year’s Resolutions That Will Make You Richer

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | RadioPublic | Stitcher | RSS

Losing weight, exercising more, spending less, paying down debt: all common New Year’s resolutions many make, but few stick to.

Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy. But using a few simple tools makes it a lot more likely.

In this week’s “Money!” podcast, we’re going to explore some wealth-creating New Year’s resolutions, and more importantly, we’re going to talk about some ways to get on track and stay there. Who knows? This could be the year you finally build that emergency fund, plan for a successful retirement, destroy that debt or otherwise make yourself wealthier. And just maybe you’ll find that by doing it right, you’ll gain without pain!

As usual, my co-host will be financial journalist Miranda Marquit.

Sit back, relax and listen to this week’s “Money!” podcast:

Not familiar with podcasts?

A podcast is basically a radio show you can listen to anytime, either by downloading it to your smartphone or other device, or by listening online.

They’re totally free. They can be any length (ours are typically about a half-hour), feature any number of people and cover any topic you can possibly think of. You can listen at home, in the car, while jogging or, if you’re like me, when riding your bike.

You can listen to our latest podcasts here or download them to your phone from any number of places, including Apple, Spotify, RadioPublic, Stitcher and RSS.

If you haven’t listened to a podcast yet, give it a try, then subscribe to ours. You’ll be glad you did!

Show notes

Want more information? Check out these resources:

About me

I founded Money Talks News in 1991. I’m a CPA, and I have also earned licenses in stocks, commodities, options principal, mutual funds, life insurance, securities supervisor and real estate.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

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What’s the Difference Between 401(k) and 403(b) Retirement Plans?

Investing in your retirement early is the best way to ensure financial stability as you age, especially when it comes to understanding various retirement options. Getting started may feel overwhelming — luckily we’re here to help. We help break down the difference between 401(k) and 403(b) accounts, and how they can impact your financial life.

You may already know the value in adjusting your budget to make saving for a rainy day a priority. But are you also prioritizing your retirement savings? If you’re just getting started in the workforce and looking for ways to invest in yourself, 401(k) and 403(b) plans are great options to know about. And, the main difference between a 401(k) and a 403(b) is the company who’s offering them.

401(k) accounts are offered by for-profit companies and 403(b) accounts are offered by nonprofit, scientific, religious, research, or university companies. To understand the similarities and differences between plans in depth, skip to the sections below or keep reading for an in-depth explanation.

How a 401(k) Works
How a 403(b) Works
The Difference Between 401(k) and 403(b)
The Similarities Between 401(k) and 403(b)
5 Ways to Grow Your Retirement Savings
What is a 401(k) and 403(b)

How a 401(k) Works

A 401(k) is a retirement account set up by for-profit employers for employees to contribute before-tax earnings. Employer-sponsored 401(k) accounts give employees the opportunity to build retirement savings in different forms — including company stocks, before-tax earnings, and exchange-traded funds (ETFs).

Each company’s retirement plans may vary on benefits like employee matching, stock options, and more. In addition, you’re able to choose how much you’d like to contribute on a monthly basis. Keep in mind, both 401(k) and 403(b) plans have a yearly limit of $19,500 with your employer matches. Plus, most retirement funds have required minimum distributions (RMDs) by the time you turn 70. This essentially means you have to take a minimum amount of money out each month whether you want to or not.

In most cases, employers will offer 401(k) matching to encourage consistent contributions. For example, your employer match may be 50 cents of every dollar you contribute up to six percent of your salary. For example, with this employer match on a $40,000 salary, you would contribute $200 and your employer would contribute an additional $100 each month. This pattern would continue until your annual contributions hit $2,400 and your employer contributes $1,200.

Employee matching is essentially free money. You’re monetarily rewarded for your retirement payments. Be sure to pay attention to vesting periods when setting up your employer match. Vesting periods are an agreed amount of time you need to work at a company before you receive your 401(k) benefits. For example, some companies may require you to work for their team for a year before earning retirement benefits. Other employers may offer retirement benefits starting the day you start working with them.

How a 403(b) Works

A 403(b) is a retirement account made by employers for tax-exempt, charitable nonprofit, scientific, religious, research, or university employees. Organizations that qualify for 403(b) accounts include school boards, public schools, churches, hospitals, and more. This type of account is also known as a tax-sheltered annuity plan — they allow pre-tax income to be invested until taken out.

Employers that offer 403(b) retirement plans may offer a pool of provider options that undergo nondiscrimination testing. This allows employers that qualify for this account to shop around for plans that offer the best benefits and don’t discriminate in favor of highly compensated employees (HCEs). For instance, some 403(b) accounts may charge more administrative fees than others.

Employers are able to offer employee matching on 403(b) accounts if they decide to. To cut costs for nonprofit companies, 403(b) retirement plans generally cost less than 401(k) accounts. Costs associated with starting up these accounts may not affect you, but it may affect your employer.

Account Type 401(k) 403(b)
Yearly Contribution Limit $19,500 $19,500
Employer-Issued Packages For-profit employers:
Corporations, private establishments, etc. and sole proprietors
Non-profit, scientific, religious, research, or university employers:
School boards, public schools, hospitals, etc.
Minimum Withdrawal Age 59.5 years old 59.5 years old
Early Withdrawal Fees 10% penalty, tax, and additional fees may vary 10% penalty, tax, and additional fees may vary
Source: IRS.org

The Differences Between 401(k) and 403(b)

Both a 401(k) and 403(b) are similar in the way they operate, but they do have a few differences. Here are the biggest contrasts to be aware of:

  • Eligibility: 401(k) retirement plans are issued by for-profit employers and the self employed, 403(b) retirement plans are for tax-exempt, non-profit, scientific, religious, research, or university employees. As well as Hospitals and Charities.
  • Investment options: 401(k)s offer more investment opportunities than 403(b)s. 401(k) accounts may include mutual funds, annuities, stocks, and bonds, while 403(b) accounts only offer annuities and mutual funds. Each employer varies in retirement benefits — reach out to a trusted financial advisor if you have questions about your account.
  • Employer expenses: 401(k) accounts are generally more expensive than 403(b) accounts. For-profit 401(k) accounts may pay sales charges, management fees, recordkeeping, and other additional expenses. 403(b) plans may have lower administrative costs to avoid adding a burden for non-profit establishments. These costs vary depending on the employer.
  • Nondiscrimination testing: This form of testing ensures that 403(b) retirement plans are not offered in favor of highly compensated employees (HCEs). However, 401(k) plans do not require this test.

The Similarities Between 401(k) and 403(b)

Aside from their differences, both accounts are set up to aid employees in retirement savings. Here’s how:

  • Contribution limits: Both accounts cap your annual contributions at $19,500. In the event you contribute over this limit, your earnings will be distributed back to you by April 15th. If you’re under your retirement contributions by the time you’re 50 years old, you’re allowed to make catch-up contributions. This means that, if you’re eligible, you can contribute $6,500 more than the yearly contribution limit.
  • Withdrawal eligibility: You must be at least 59.5 years old before withdrawing your retirement savings. In the case of an emergency, you may be eligible for early withdrawal. However, you may be charged penalties, taxes, and fees for doing so.
  • Employer matching: Both retirement account options allow employers to match your contributions, but are not required to. When starting your retirement fund, ask your HR representative about potential benefits and employer matching.
  • Early withdrawal penalties: If you choose to withdraw your retirement savings early, you may be penalized. In most cases, you need a valid reason to withdraw your funds early. Eligible reasons may include outstanding debt, bankruptcy, foreclosure, or medical bills. In addition, you may be charged a 10 percent penalty fee, taxes, and other fees. During a downturned economy, as we’ve seen with the COVID-19 pandemic, fees may be waived.

5 Ways to Grow Your Retirement Savings

5 Ways to Grow Your Retirement Savings

Contributing to a 401(k) or 403(b) can help grow your investments at a reduced risk. You’re able to grow your non-taxed income to put towards your future goals. The more you contribute, the more you may have by the time you retire. Here are a few tips to get ahead of the game and invest in your financial future.

1. Create a Retirement Account Early

It’s never too late to start a retirement account. If you’re currently employed, but haven’t set up your retirement account, reach out to your HR representative. Ask about retirement plan options and their benefits. When employers offer retirement matches, consider contributing as much as you can to meet their match.

2. Set up Monthly Automatic Contributions

Save time and energy by setting up automatic contributions. You may feel less interested in contributing to your retirement as your payday approaches. Taking time to set up a retirement fund and budgeting for this change may be holding you back. To meet your retirement goals, consider setting up automatic payments through your employer. After a while, you may not even notice the slight budget adjustment.

3. Leverage Employer Matching

Employer matching is essentially free money. Employers may put money towards your future for nothing but your own contribution. This encourages employees to consistently put money towards their retirement savings. Not only are you able to earn extra money each month, but this “free money” will grow with interest over time. If you can, match your employer’s contribution percentage, if not more.

4. Avoid Early Withdrawal

Credit card balances, student loans, and mortgages can be stressful. Instead of withdrawing early from your retirement fund to pay for these, consider other debt payoff methods. If you’re eligible to withdraw from your retirement early, you may face penalty fees, taxes, and administrative expenses. This may hinder your savings potential or push back your desired retirement date.

5. Contribute Your Future Raises and Bonuses

If you’re saving less than $19,500 to your retirement fund this year, consider contributing more. If you earn a bonus or a raise, stick to your current budget and consider increasing your contributions. Ask your employer to increase your retirement payments right before you receive a bonus or raise. The more you contribute, the more interest you’ll accrue over time.

Whether your retirement funds are established through a 401(k) or a 403(b), these accounts offer you the chance to build your financial portfolio. Consistently funding your retirement account may better your financial plan and set you at ease. As your contributions age, so do your interest earnings. You’ll be able to make money on your pre-taxed income and set your future self up for success. Get started by checking in on your budget and carving out a specific amount to put towards your retirement each month.

Learn more about security

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Source: mint.intuit.com

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Mortgage Rates vs. the Coronavirus: We Might Test New All-Time Lows

Posted on February 24th, 2020

Mortgage rates can be pretty volatile. Just like stocks, they can change daily depending on what’s happening in the economy.

Beyond that, mortgage rates can move based on news that doesn’t involve a report on the economic calendar, such as a jobs report, GDP, housing starts, inflation, etc.

Even if there isn’t a direct financial implication to a news story, mortgage rates can go up or down.

Just consider the recent conflict with Iran, which may have pushed mortgage rates down a little lower, even though it was unclear what the outcome would be.

It turned out to be a short-lived situation, despite any obvious conclusion or resolution, but that’s just one of many recent examples.

How the Coronavirus Could Affect Mortgage Rates

  • Fear of a global economic slowdown has hit financial markets
  • Dow Jones off nearly 1,000 points, Nasdaq down 350 points
  • Investors fleeing market for safety of alternatives like bonds
  • This has pushed the 10-year bond yield down near its all-time low

Now we’re dealing with what could be seen as a global pandemic in the spread of Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19).

It may or may not have originated in Wuhan, China, but it has rapidly made its way across the globe, with Italy just confirming a fifth death from the virus.

The World Health Organization (WHO) hasn’t yet declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, but did say it has “pandemic potential.”

In other words, there’s a lot to fear due to the unknown and the very real loss of life, and that explains the recent pullback in the stock market.

At the time of this writing, the Dow Jones was off nearly 1,000 points and the Nasdaq was down over 350 points. And that’s after a bad Friday as well.

Part of that has to do with the fact that large companies like Apple have already warned of profit hits due to global supply chain issues, which may affect sales.

The trillion-dollar company acts as a bellwether to other large corporations and the economy at large.

In short, when bad news happens, stocks go down. This is the market’s natural tendency to flee the volatility of the stock market for the relative safety of the bond market.

Some investors may also seek out “safe haven assets” such as gold, which tend to perform well in times of fear and despair.

There is typically a negative correlation between stocks and bond prices, and so today we’re seeing a big drop in the 10-year bond yield.

Long story short, when bond yields drop, so too do mortgage rates.

The Coronavirus Has the Ability to Push Mortgage Rates to All-Time Lows

  • 30-year fixed rates are only about .25% above all-time lows
  • Won’t take much for mortgage rates to test new records
  • Impact will depend on whether coronavirus spreads or slows
  • Watch out for a quick reversal if any good news surfaces

We know investors are quick to ditch risk when there’s uncertainty in the air. But the bigger question is will this pullback be meaningful?

Will it actually matter in a few months (or even a few weeks), or will it turn out to be just another headline that goes away once things settle down?

Hopefully it does get resolved soon for the sake of anyone affected.

But because we don’t have those answers yet, there’s a good chance stocks will continue to fall, at least in the short term.

As such, expect increased downward pressure to apply to mortgage rates too, which might be good news for those looking to refinance a mortgage or purchase a home.

Of course, mortgage rates are already pretty rock-bottom, and not necessarily holding anyone back. It’s the sky-high home prices that are causing affordability issues.

And really, lower rates may just exacerbate an already hot housing market, which is ushering in a return to bidding wars.

With regard to how much rates might move, it’s not totally clear since the coronavirus outlook can change in an instant.

As it stands now, the 30-year fixed is averaging 3.49%, which is just 18 basis points (0.18%) above its all-time low, per Freddie Mac data.

It wouldn’t take a whole lot for rates to test new historic lows given the fear and uncertainty at the moment.

Conversely, mortgage lenders will be quick to adjust their rate sheets higher if there’s any glimmer of good news on the topic.

Remember, with rates already so low, it’s harder for them to move even lower than it is for lenders to stand put or simply increase them.

Read more: Why It Might Be Better to Apply for a Mortgage When Things Are Slow

Don't let today's rates get away.
About the Author: Colin Robertson

Before creating this blog, Colin worked as an account executive for a wholesale mortgage lender in Los Angeles. He has been writing passionately about mortgages for nearly 15 years.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

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Watch Out for Low Mortgage Rates You Have to Pay For

Posted on November 4th, 2020

Mortgage rates keep on marching lower and lower, with new records broken seemingly every week.

But with all the fervor surrounding mortgage rates, some lenders are playing the “how low can we appear to go” game.

For example, mortgage lenders may be talking about their lowest rates (with multiple points required), as opposed to offering their par rates, the latter coming at no extra cost to the consumer.

So instead of being presented with a mortgage rate of say 2.75% on a 30-year fixed, you may see a rate as low as 1.99%. Or even a 15-year fixed at 1.75%!

Here’s the problem; with mortgage rates breaking record lows time and time again, 10+ times so far in 2020, many homeowners are finding the need to refinance the mortgage twice. Or even three times.

And those who chose to pay points at closing, only to refinance within months or a year, essentially left money on the table.

Or they decide not to refinance to an even lower rate, knowing they’ll lose that upfront cost that’s already been paid, which is also a tough situation.

Mortgage Rates Aren’t as Low as They Appear

  • In order to advertise lower mortgage rates lower than the competition
  • Lenders will often tack on discount points to their publicized rates
  • Meaning you’ll have to pay a certain amount upfront to obtain the low rate in question
  • Make sure you’re actually comparing apples to apple when mortgage rate shopping

Guess what? That absurdly low mortgage rate you saw advertised isn’t really as low as it seems.

Typically, when you see a rate that’s beating the pants off the national average, and all other lenders, mortgage points must be paid.

And when the rate is really, really low, it usually means multiple mortgage points must be paid.

In other words, you wind up paying a substantial amount of money, known as prepaid interest, to secure an ultra low, below-market interest rate.

Assuming your loan amount is $200,000, two points to obtain a rate of 1.99% on a 30-year fixed would set you back $4,000.

If the loan amount were $400,000, we’re talking $8,000 upfront to secure that super awesome low rate.

Tip: Watch out for lenders and mortgage brokers who quote you a low mortgage rate, but neglect to tell you that you must pay a point (or two) upfront to obtain it.

Often, this tactic is employed to snag your business, and once you’re committed, the truth comes out, which is why mortgage APR is so important.

Is Paying for an Even Lower Mortgage Rate Right Now the Smart Move?

  • When mortgage rates are already really low (record lows at the moment)
  • It becomes somewhat less attractive to pay points at closing
  • It could be pretty expensive to get just a slightly lower rate that will save you very little
  • And your money might be better served elsewhere, especially if inflation worsens

Here’s the thing. Mortgage rates are already so low that paying mortgage discount points to go even lower isn’t all that attractive.

There’s a great chance mortgage rates will surge higher in the future as inflation finally rears its ugly head. And at that point, you’ll already have an insanely low interest rate.

On top of that, you’ll be able to invest your liquid assets in other high-yielding accounts, likely something pretty darn safe with a rate of return that will beat your low mortgage rate.

So why keep going lower and lower if you’re already paying next to nothing on your home loan?

Additionally, you won’t want to spread yourself too thin, especially if you’re buying a new house.

There are a ton of costs associated with a new home purchase, so committing all your liquidity to an even lower rate could mean that you won’t have money for relocation costs, furnishings, necessary repairs, or an upgrade.

And as mentioned, mortgage rates do have the potential to move even lower than current levels, meaning it could make sense to refinance again, favoring those who didn’t pay much to anything at closing.

Or better yet, just went with a no cost refinance to avoid paying anything to the bank or lender.

As always, do the math to see what makes sense for you. If you’re super serious about paying off your mortgage early, then buying down your rate could be the right move.

It will certainly vary based on your unique financial situation, the loan amount, the cost to buy down the rate, and how long you plan to stay with the loan/home.

Certainly take the time to compare mortgage rates with and without points, but don’t just chase a low rate below an emotional threshold, like 2%.

And determine how long it’ll take to pay back any points at closing with regular monthly mortgage payments.

Personally, locking in a 30-year fixed rate below 3% seems like a tremendous bargain.

Investing the money elsewhere, such as in stocks or bonds or wherever else, could end up being a lot more rewarding than paying prepaid interest at closing.

Perhaps more importantly, you’ll have access to that money if and when necessary for more pressing matters.

Lastly, you can always pay extra each month if and when you choose to reduce your principal balance and total interest paid. So that’s always an option regardless of the rate you wind up with.

Read more: Are mortgage points worth the cost?

Don't let today's rates get away.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

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Stock Market Today: U.S. Capitol Under Attack, Dow Sets New Highs Anyway

U.S. stocks’ ascent to new highs Wednesday came in bizarre and stunning contrast to what unfolded in Washington, D.C.

Earlier in the day, Democratic control of the Senate – a thin possibility just a couple of months ago – suddenly seemed likely after strong showings by the Rev. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff in Tuesday’s Georgia Senate runoffs (both were declared the winners of their respective races by Wednesday afternoon). Stocks responded with a sharp morning lift.

Meanwhile, in Washington, a last-minute attempt to keep Congress from accepting the presidential election results fizzled as Vice President Mike Pence demurred and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell discouraged overturning the vote. But those proceedings were interrupted by a violent pro-Trump mob, who attacked federal police and breached the Capitol, which had to be put on lockdown.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average, which flirted with 31,000 momentarily, still finished with an 1.4% gain to a record 30,829, led by the likes of Caterpillar (CAT, +5.7%) and Dow Inc. (DOW, +4.8%). And the small-cap Russell 2000 vigorously overtook its old highs, ramping up 4.0% to finish at 2,057.

Other action in the stock market today:

  • The S&P 500 finished 0.6% higher to 3,748.
  • The Nasdaq Composite pulled back 0.6% to 12,740, despite yet another big gain by Tesla (TSLA, +2.8%). 
  • U.S. crude oil futures finished up another 1.1% to $50.63 per barrel.
  • Gold futures sank by 2.3% to $1,908.60.
  • Bitcoin prices, at roughly $34,000 yesterday, neared $36,000 on Tuesday. (Bitcoin prices reported here are as of 4 p.m. each trading day.)

Investing in the New Washington Landscape

President-Elect Joe Biden’s policy proposals won’t all be rubber-stamped, given a thin Senate majority (courtesy of the vice presidential tiebreaker), but the Senate swing does accelerate some investment trends that hinged on Democratic control of Washington.

“The growth-into-value rotation may be reinforced after the results of the Georgia Senate election amid the prospect of a higher fiscal stimulus bill and steeper yield curve, which would benefit banks and other non-tech companies,” says David Bahnsen, chief investment officer of The Bahnsen Group.

Indeed, many of our top picks in financials, industrials and materials finished solidly higher Wednesday. Industries benefiting most from Democratic control, such as green energy and marijuana stocks, also enjoyed robust gains.

Amid the change in political tides, we’ve taken another look at – and added to – our list of stocks poised to gain from a new White House tenant. Read on as we explore 17 picks that could reap the benefits of various policies that might be put in place over the next few years.

Kyle Woodley was long Bitcoin as of this writing.

Source: kiplinger.com

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