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How Long Does It Take to Close On A House?

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The closing process on a home purchase can take anywhere from a week to 60 days, depending on the property type, whether or not you’re buying with a mortgage and what type of loan you’re taking out. The closing process includes two distinct periods:

Escrow is the period of time between when you and the seller sign the contract and the day you close.

Closing day is the day you sign all the paperwork, get the keys and become the official owner of a home.

How long does it take to close on a house with cash?

Part of what makes closings take so long is the financing requirements, so buying with cash can expedite the process. If you’re buying with cash, you can close as few as seven days after contract execution, assuming you’re willing to waive contingencies. However, only 23% of buyers purchase their homes with all cash, according to the Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report 2018.

How long does it take to close on a house with a mortgage?

Buyers who use conventional financing to purchase a home can expect to close 30-45 days after the contract is signed. Special loans, such as first-time home buyer programs, VA and FHA loans can take longer to close because the requirements are stricter.

The escrow process timeline

After you’ve made an offer on a home and both you and the seller have agreed on terms (including price and closing date) and executed the contract, you’re officially in escrow. These are the steps that are usually part of the escrow process, and how long each step typically takes. Keep in mind that the escrow process and timeline can vary based on your market, lender, property type, financing type and the overall complexity of the transaction. You should also note that some of the steps below happen concurrently.

  1. Execute the contract and confirm closing date
  2. Open the escrow account (a few days)
  3. Complete inspection and repair requests (1-2 weeks)
  4. Mortgage application and underwriting (5-20 days)
  5. Appraisal (1-2 weeks)
  6. Acquire homeowner’s insurance and title insurance (1 day)
  7. Get loan approval, commonly called “Clear to close” (1 day)
  8. Do a final walk through (1 day)
  9. Attend your closing appointment and close on your new home (1 days)

According to Zillow Consumer Housing Trends Report 2019, 57% of buyers who attained a mortgage said one of their concerns was being unclear on how the mortgage process works. To make sure you fully understand the steps, stay in close contact with your real estate agent, real estate attorney (if you have/need one) and lender. They’ll be able to answer any questions you have and provide documents you need to sign, so be available to turn those requests around as quickly as possible.

The process of buying a house with cash

If you’re buying a home with all cash and still including common contingencies (like a home inspection contingency), your process will be the same, except you won’t have to do a mortgage application or wait for loan underwriting and approval. Some cash buyers opt to waive contingencies, which can speed up the process.

How long after the appraisal can you close?

Assuming there are no issues with your appraisal, the lender will send the “clear to close” about a week before the agreed-upon closing date. If you’ve requested a longer escrow period and a later closing date, you may get your “clear to close” well in advance of your closing date.

What causes delays when closing on a house?

Your closing date will usually be agreed upon with the seller during offer negotiations. But, your closing date could get pushed back a few days (or even a few weeks) based on unexpected setbacks. Here are some of the common issues that can lead to a delayed closing.

Buyer financing

Most of the time, delayed closings are related to finalizing your mortgage. This can be anything from appraisal concerns to missing financial documentation to an inexperienced loan officer.

Changes to your creditworthiness

If you’ve made large purchases, taken out another loan that negatively impacted your debt-to-income ratio or had a significant change in your income between the time you were pre-approved and closing, your lender may need to re-evaluate your credit profile, which can take time.

Low appraisal

If your appraisal comes in at or above the contracted sale price, it should be smooth sailing. But, a low appraisal could leave you needing to renegotiate with the seller or come up with enough cash to cover the difference between the home’s appraised value and the sale price.

Title issues

If the seller has any unresolved liens or judgments on the home, or if any other ownership disputes are uncovered during the escrow process, the closing can be delayed while these issues are resolved.

Homeowner’s insurance

In order to close, you must have proof that you’ve secured a homeowner’s insurance policy on the property you’re buying. If you miss this step or don’t have the correct documentation, your closing could be delayed.

Home sale contingency

If your contract says you can’t close until your previous home sells, your closing could be delayed if it takes longer than expected.

Slow repair requests

If you’re going back and forth with the seller on repairs needed based on the home inspection report, both the negotiations and the repairs themselves can slow down your closing timeline.

Unsatisfactory walk-through

Right before closing, you’ll do a final walk-through of the property. If the home isn’t in the same condition (or a better condition, if you negotiated repairs) than when you made your offer, you may delay closing until issues can be resolved.

Tips for staying on your closing timeline

Even if you’re buying with a mortgage (and you’ll be among the 77% of all buyers who are), you can help expedite the closing process by being prepared, responsive, diligent and decisive both before and during the escrow period.

Get pre-approved

Before you even start searching for homes, take the time to get pre-approved so you’ll know ahead of time that you’re eligible for a loan in the amount you need. Not only will it help you prevent delays during the escrow period, but it will make any offers you submit look more legitimate in the eyes of sellers, since they know you can pay for the home.

For a pre-approval, you’ll need documents that verify your income, like paystubs, bank statements and tax returns. You’ll also want to make sure your credit report is error free, as your lender will run your credit as part of your pre-approval.

Schedule the inspection as soon as possible

As soon as your offer is accepted and the contract is executed, schedule your home inspection. In some states, you are required to schedule the inspection within 7-10 days. After you receive the inspection report, you will have a few days to review and request repairs or credits from the seller. Keep in mind, the seller will have a few days to respond as well.

Buyers of Zillow-owned homes can have peace of mind that the home has been recently updated by licensed contractors. Of course, you’re still able to do your own independent home inspection.

Have a backup plan in case of a low appraisal

Appraisal reports can vary, and very rarely do two professional appraisers value a home exactly the same. If the home you’re buying appraises for less than the sale price, your lender won’t let you finance the home using the full sale price. If your appraisal comes back low, you have two options: either make up the difference in cash, or renegotiate the sale price with the seller. If you’re in a hot market where sellers have their pick of multiple offers, you shouldn’t expect the seller to lower their price to accommodate a low appraisal.

Hire an experienced lender

Find an experienced lender that is familiar with the intricacies and requirements of your market for a seamless and transparent closing process. Opt for an online lender to further optimize your experience. In fact, 15% of buyers who used a mortgage to finance a home in 2019 obtained their mortgage through an online lender. Though, younger buyers are more likely to choose an online lender option.

Be quick to respond to documentation requests

It’s likely that your lender will need updated financial documents, signed disclosures and other information as they prepare your loan for closing. Your title or escrow company may need you to complete certain tasks, too. Respond to all requests as quickly as possible to keep the escrow process moving forward.

How long does closing day take?

Closing day — that is, the day you go to the closing agent and sign your final paperwork to buy the home — typically takes between 1.5-2 hours if everything goes smoothly, but you’ll want to leave ample time in your schedule in case it takes longer.

During your closing appointment you’ll sign documents (a list of typical documents is below) and pay your down payment. Your lender will also wire the balance of the sale price at this time. The title or escrow agent will facilitate the closing appointment, but you’ll want your agent and/or attorney to be present as well. In closing attorney states, the attorney may facilitate the closing appointment. Be sure to bring your ID, a cashier’s check, proof of insurance and your purchase and sale contract.

Buyers usually must attend this meeting in person, whereas sellers can sometimes sign their paperwork ahead of time.

What documents do buyers usually sign?

  • Promissory note
  • Mortgage/deed of trust
  • Escrow disclosure
  • Signature affidavit
  • Initial mortgage payment
  • Appraisal acknowledgement
  • HOA documents (if applicable)
  • Certificate of occupancy (new construction only)
  • Equal Credit Opportunity Act disclosure
  • Truth-in-Lending disclosure
  • Mortgage fraud statements

Source: zillow.com

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Buying a Home in 2021? 11 Tips to Get It Done!

If you’ve yet to enter the housing market, but are thinking of buying a home in 2021, there’s a lot you need to know.

As I once pointed out, this isn’t your older sibling’s housing market. Not just anyone can get a mortgage these days. You actually have to qualify. But we’ll get to that in a minute.

Let’s start by talking about home prices, which have soared in recent years. The good news is mortgage rates remain very low, and may even break new record lows this year, which can keep affordability within reach.

1. Prepare for More Sticker Shock

Yes, if you’re prepping to buy a home in 2021, expect to be shocked, and not in a good way. At this point in the cycle, home prices have eclipsed old all-time highs in many parts of the country.

And even if they haven’t yet, there’s a good chance you’ll be paying more than the Zestimate or Redfin Estimate for the property in question due to limited inventory and strong home buyer demand.

The bad news for renters is home prices are expected to rise another 10% this year, so things are just getting more and more expensive.

In short, expect to shell out a lot of dough if you want a home in 2021, and that could often mean paying over asking price, even if the original list price seems high.

2. Get Pre-Approved for a Home Loan Early

Speaking of that home being out of your price range, you may want to get pre-approved with a bank or mortgage lender ASAP.

First off, real estate agents won’t give you the time of day without one, especially in a red-hot market.

And secondly, if you don’t know how much house you can afford, you’re basically wasting your time by perusing listings and going to open houses.

This is especially true if the homes you’ve got your eye on are consistently going above asking since you’ll need even more purchasing power.

It’s not hard or all that time consuming to get a mortgage pre-approval, and it’ll give you more confidence and perhaps make you more serious about finally making the move.

Tip: Look for an online mortgage lender that lets you generate a pre-approval on the fly in minutes (and know you don’t have to use them if and when you proceed with a purchase!).

3. Check Your Credit Scores and Put Away Your Credit Cards

While you’re at it, you should check your credit scores (all 3 of them) and determine if anything needs to be addressed.

As I always say, credit scoring changes can take time, so give yourself plenty of it. Don’t wait until the last minute to fix any errors or issues.

And while you’re addressing anything that needs more attention, do yourself a favor and put the credit cards in the freezer (or somewhere else out of reach).

Lots of spending, even if you pay it back, can ding your scores, even if just momentarily. It can also increase your DTI ratio and limit your purchasing power. Ultimately, bad timing can create big headaches.

Additionally, pumping the brakes on spending might give you a nice buffer for closing costs, down payment funds, moving costs, and renovation expenses once you do buy.

4. Housing Inventory Will Be…Limited

It’s the same story in 2021 as it was in 2020, 2019, 2018, and heck, even as far back as 2012. There’s really been a lack of inventory since the housing market bottomed because homes were never for sale en masse.

During the prior housing crisis, borrowers got foreclosed on or deployed real estate short sales to move on, and banks made sure all that inventory never flooded the market.

Now we’ve got would-be sellers with nowhere to go, thanks to the massive price increases realized in the past few years. It’s hard to move up or downsize, so a lot of folks are staying put. That means less choice for you.

While we saw an uptick in inventory in 2019, it appeared to be short-lived and now housing supply is at an all-time low!

With near-record low interest rates and lots of Americans hitting the ripe first-time buyer age of 34, expect competition to intensify.

Again, this supports the argument of being prepared early so you’re ready to make an offer at a moment’s notice!

5. That Home Might Be a Fixer

You probably don’t have the same skill set as Joanna and Chip Gaines, but you might still wind up with a fixer-upper thanks to those inventory constraints. And that’s totally okay.

What I’ve learned from buying real estate is that you’ll typically never be content with the upgrades previous owners or developers make, even if they were super expensive and high quality. So why pay extra for it?

There’s a good chance you’ll want to make the home yours, with special touches and changes that distance yourself from the previous owner.

Don’t be afraid to go down that road, but also know the difference between superficial blemishes and design challenges, and even worse, major problems.

Especially this year, watch out for money pits that sellers can finally unload because real estate is just so very hot.

Those properties that could never sell may finally find a buyer, and you might not want that buyer to be you.

6. You May Have to Fight for It

What’s even more annoying is that you may have to fight to get your hands on the few properties that are out there, depending on the housing market in question.

In popular metros, bidding wars will still take place, and they even become the norm again as they were in previous years.

If the property is popular, there will always be someone willing to outbid you for that home they just must have. This is another reason why the fixer can be a winner, the hidden gem if you will.

That being said, it’s okay to pay more than asking (or even the fully appraised value), just keep in mind that there are plenty of fish in the sea.

Well, perhaps not plenty right now, but there’s always another opportunity around the corner.

Stay poised and don’t let your emotions get the best of you. Like anything else, it’s okay to walk away. Trust your gut.

7. Still Negotiate with the Seller

Just because 2021 will be a seller’s market once again, at least in popular markets, doesn’t mean you can’t negotiate. You can still get into a bidding war, win the thing, and then inspect the heck out of the house.

Inspections are key to determining what will need to be addressed once the home changes hands, and what the seller will need to do to compensate you for those issues.

If you don’t get a quality inspection (or two), you will have a difficult time asking for credits for closing costs or even a lower purchase price. Take it very seriously, the return on investment can be staggering.

Also know that in some markets, buyers may have the upper hand in 2021. Not all real estate markets are red-hot anymore, so you might be able to bid below asking and still get money for repairs.

8. Do Your Mortgage Homework

While you might have your hands full with an overzealous real estate agent, it’s important not to neglect your mortgage homework.

Mortgages are often just mailed in, with little attention given to where they are originated.

Your real estate agent will have their preferred lender that you “really should consider using because they’re the best,” but you don’t have to use them or even speak to them.

I’ll typically say get a quote from them as a courtesy to keep things amicable, and to appease your agent, but also shop around with other banks, credit unions, lenders, and mortgage brokers.

At the same time, think about how you want to structure the mortgage, including down payment, loan type (FHA or conventional), and loan program.

The 30-year fixed isn’t always a no-brainer, though right now it’s a tough argument to go against it.

There are other loan programs that can make sense too, such as the 5/1 ARM, which often get swept under the rug. Make the choice yourself.

9. Expect a Very Good Mortgage Rate

If you’ve done your homework and are in good financial shape, you should be able to get your hands on a very low mortgage rate in 2021.

In fact, mortgage interest rates are historically amazing at the moment and could even reach new depths depending on what transpires this year.

Once again, the 2021 mortgage rate forecast looks excellent, so they may stay put for awhile longer or even hit new all-time lows.

In terms of financing, it’s still a great time to buy a home. Consider that the silver lining to an otherwise pricey and competitive housing market.

Of course, with home prices creeping higher and higher, even a low interest rate may not be enough to offset that growing monthly payment.

So always make time to shop to ensure you get the best rate and the lowest fees, even if financing is on sale.

Just because rates are cheap doesn’t mean you should just accept what’s thrown in front of you. Still complain, still negotiate, still ask for more!

10. The Best Time to Buy Might Be Later in the Year

Before you get too excited, or worried that time is running out, it might actually be in your favor to slow play this one.

Per Zillow, the best time to buy a home may be in late summer, including the months of August and September.

Basically, you’ve got the slow, cold months at the start of the year where there isn’t much inventory, followed by the strong spring housing market where everyone and their mother wants to buy.

Then you get a lull and perhaps even a dip in home prices during summer, which could be an attractive entry point.

You might even get lucky and snag a price cut with a lot less competition while other prospective buyers are on vacation.

That being said, get pre-approved NOW and set up your alerts for new listings ASAP and just be ready to pounce whenever.

11. Are You Sure You Want to Buy a Home?

Lastly, take a moment to ensure you actually want to buy a home as opposed to continuing to rent.

I constantly hear the old “throwing away money on rent” line and it never gets old. Then I proceed to fantasize about renting with not a care in the world.

Are you sure you’re throwing away money on rent? Renting can be pretty awesome.

You don’t pay property taxes, homeowners insurance, HOA dues, PMI, or mortgage interest. And you can leave whenever you want. That sounds like a sweet deal too.

Oh, and if anything goes wrong, you can just call your landlord or property management company.

With a home, the problem is yours, and yours alone to deal with. Broken water heater? You’re paying thousands out of pocket, not the landlord.

Consider the Effects of COVID-19

One extra thing to consider given the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic that reared its head last year.

As you might expect, it’s making the home buying and selling process a bit more complicated than usual, despite companies learning to adapt.

For example, home sellers are more reluctant to hold open houses or let anyone in their home, and prospective buyers are probably also a bit apprehensive entering a stranger’s house.

But it’s still very important to get a good look at a property you’re considering buying. The same goes for the home inspection and the home appraisal.

Both should still be taken very seriously, even if more difficult to complete.

A home purchase doesn’t necessarily have to be put on hold due to COVID-19, but it might require more thought given the increased uncertainty with the economy, demographic shifts (city vs. suburban living), and so on.

Also, think before you make a complete lifestyle change like moving out of the city and into the country, just because it’s on-trend. You might look back in a year or two and say what was I thinking?!

Ultimately, you should always give a home purchase a ton of thought though, so for me not much has changed.

Read more: When to look for a house to buy.

Don't let today's rates get away.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

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My House Failed Its First Real Estate Inspection—Here’s What I Did To Get Through Escrow

When I was buying my first house, everything seemed too good to be true—at least at the start of the process. I found a home within a couple of weeks, the price was fabulously low, it was in a cute lake community with a style I loved, and funding came through quickly and easily. I even received a first-time home buyer’s bonus for tax time. Plus, I didn’t need much of a down payment.

But it turned out too good to be true. My smooth path to homeownership suddenly became rocky when the inspection report came back with a big fat failure on it. I immediately panicked. What did it mean? Was I still able to buy the house? And if I did, was it going to fall apart?

After a few calls with my real estate agent (who, at that point, had become more of a home-buying therapist), I learned that a bad inspection isn’t that rare. In fact, my new home wasn’t in as bad of shape as I initially feared. We were able to make some repairs and, after a second inspection, the house was appraised and the sale was able to go through.

During the process, though, I learned a lot more than I ever expected about home inspections. Whether you’re a first-time or repeat home buyer, here’s my advice for getting the house you want after a shaky home inspection.

Houses don’t really pass or fail

Though my home inspection appeared to be a failure, homes aren’t actually graded on a pass/fail system.

“There is no such thing as a failed inspection,” said Karen Kostiw, an agent with Warburg Realty in New York. “The inspection just points out small and potentially larger issues that you may not be aware of.”

Sure, some houses can sail through the process and others may fare poorly, but it’s not a “You can never buy this” situation if there are problems with the property.

For me, my mortgage hinged on a solid inspection—so the initial results meant I wouldn’t get the loan unless things were fixed. That being said, if I had enough cash on hand or wanted to try a different mortgage lender, I could have continued with the purchase even with a negative inspection report.

So if the house you’re set on buying ends up having issues, don’t panic. You still have options.

Most inspection issues are small

It’s important to remember every home inspection report will come back with something, according to Kate Ziegler, a real estate agent with Arborview Realty in Boston. My inspection report had noted about 40 fixes. But a lot of times, the problems aren’t as bad as you think.

Keep in mind that the inspector’s job is to call out any trouble spot. Also, all issues noted in the report aren’t equal: Some problems flagged by an inspector can wait.

“The inspector will find defects—sometimes many defects—but that does not mean buyers are not purchasing a good home,” Kostiw says. “The small leak might mean a bolt needs to be tightened, or the dishwasher is not working because the waterline was switched off by accident. These are easy fixes. However, when buyers see a laundry list of items, it can seem as if the home is falling down. This is most often not the case.”

Red flags do exist

Ziegler and Kostiw agree that though most repairs are easy fixes, some items should give you pause if you see them on your report.

Structural problems, antique electrical systems, old windows, unexplained water damage, evidence of termites or wood rot, a bad roof, asbestos, mold, radon, and lead paint are all red flags that can show up during a home inspection. If fixing these problems is impossible or way beyond the means your budget, you may want to reconsider your purchase.

“Whether or not inspection items warrant backing out entirely depends quite a bit on any individual buyer’s experience and bandwidth, as well as personal risk tolerances and financial situation,” Ziegler says. “It’s true that houses don’t stay in good repair on their own. They require maintenance and care, just like your houseplants and your sourdough starter!”

Don’t try to fix things yourself

Unless a repair is something truly minor like caulking a bathroom tub or putting a cabinet door back on its hinges, don’t try to fix anything on your own. You could make things worse or even injure yourself. Hire licensed contractors that you’ve vetted to handle any problems. And try not to leave it all up to the seller—they’re not going to be living in the home. You will be.

“Motivations in this case are not aligned,” Ziegler says. “The seller wants to spend as little as possible to meet their contractual obligations, but [a] buyer should be more concerned with the quality of the repair.”

Work the costs into the sale

At first I worried I would have to pay to fix everything that was wrong with my house. But it’s important to know you can work the cost of repairs—and how long it should take to make them—into the sale.

Say you can’t afford to fix the busted water heater but the seller can. You can raise the offer price by that cost, or you can trade off: The seller fixes one thing, and you fix another. In my case, I only had to add a banister to one stairwell. The sellers were particularly motivated to unload the home so they handled everything else.

Hopefully by the end of this process, every issue will be fixed and you’ll be ready to purchase your home. And you’ll be able to move in with a clear head, knowing everything is really as good as it seems.

Source: realtor.com

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