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Can Adding a Pool Increase Your Home Value?

On scorching hot days, there’s nothing like taking a dip in a swimming pool. In some areas of the country, a swimming pool is close to a necessity. In fact, there are 10.6 million swimming pools across the U.S., with 3,000,000 of those in California alone. From in-ground to above-ground, chlorine to saltwater, there are numerous styles, sizes, and prices of swimming pools. And while having a swimming pool just steps from your back door may sound appealing, is it really a good economical choice and does it increase your home’s value? There are a lot of factors to consider before adding a swimming pool, or even before buying a home with an existing swimming pool.

installing a pool at homeinstalling a pool at home

The Cost To Install

While having a pool sounds like a great way to be the life of the party when hosting friends and family during warm months, it can be pricey. And as with most large purchases many people finance the addition. The average cost to build an inground swimming pool is $35,000, with most spending between $28,000 to $55,000 for the initial investment. Of course, the amount of site work, soil type, and additional finishes can greatly impact the cost of a swimming pool. For many, the equivalent of a new car is worth the enjoyment a swimming pool would bring.

The Cost To Maintain

The costs associated with maintaining a swimming vary based on location, size, and type. According to Michelle Sbabo, co-owner of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa, homeowners can “expect to spend a minimum of $500 per summer on chemicals and supplies – plus at least a couple of hours a week testing water, adjusting chemicals, brushing, vacuuming, cleaning filters, netting, and emptying skimmer and filter baskets.” Depending on the type of swimming pool, average annual maintenance costs can vary from $375 to over $2,750. When choosing the type of swimming pool, it’s important to inquire with a local pool maintenance company what to reasonably expect in annual maintenance costs.

Read: Tips for Selecting Above-ground Pool Equipment

The Cost To Open and Close A Pool

For some parts of the country, swimming pools can remain open year-round; however, in colder climates, homeowners must close swimming pools to prevent damage from cold weather. According to Sbabo, “Closing a pool will run $200-300 for a standard pool, more with complex equipment and plumbing. Opening a pool is roughly the same cost as closing – unless the pool is extremely green or dirty and requires more time and chemicals to clean up.”

pool at housepool at house

How Your Geographic Location Affects Your Investment

Michelle Sbabo of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa also explains that “The contents of source water also affect pool water care. In many parts of the country, for example, the water is very high in calcium and other minerals. This can cause scaling on pool surfaces and inside equipment, and water must be treated appropriately to minimize scale damage. Additionally, weather and environment greatly impact pool care. Pools in areas with a lot of rain or wind may need a greater range of chemicals to address contaminants that enter the pool. And certain plants and trees can cause maintenance issues.”

Read: Tips for Landscaping Around a Pool

How A Swimming Pool Affects Homeowner’s Insurance

Once a swimming pool is on a property, the chance for injury or death increases which is why homeowner’s insurance increases with a pool. According to Zack’s Investment Research, insurance companies typically require an increased liability coverage, sometimes up to half a million dollars, and some even encourage additional umbrella policies. There are ways to keep premiums at a reasonable rate by installing a locking gate around the pool, keeping the pool covered with a safety tarp, adding motion sensors to the pool, and even cameras surrounding the pool.

…But Will A Pool Add To Your Home’s Value?

One of the important things to remember: swimming pools aren’t for everyone. So just by the mere fact that a pool is on the property, there will be a group of potential home buyers that will not be interested. However, the bottom-line answer is: it depends. For some geographic areas (like Southern Florida or California), a swimming pool can certainly increase appeal- and value. However, in areas like Michigan or Northern states, they may have less desirability and the pool could appraise for less than the install price. However, a recent study by LendingTree shows that homes with a pool are valued at 54% higher than those without one.

Tips From The Expert

Michelle Sbabo, co-owner of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa offers a few tips for those thinking of adding a pool or buying a home with an existing pool.

  • Most home inspections don’t include the pool. If the buyer is new to pools, it’s a good idea to hire a pool pro to check the equipment and understand any potential expenses.
  • Contact a local pool maintenance company to teach you how to care for a pool. Many new pool owners greatly benefit from a “private pool lesson”.
  • Check into a Home Warranty that covers pool equipment. We have seen major equipment expenses covered by good warranty programs with only a small deductible out of pocket.


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Jennifer is an accidental house flipper turned Realtor and real estate investor. She is the voice behind the blog, Bachelorette Pad Flip. Over five years, Jennifer paid off $70,000 in student loan debt through real estate investing. She’s passionate about the power of real estate. She’s also passionate about southern cooking, good architecture, and thrift store treasure hunting. She calls Northwest Arkansas home with her cat Smokey, but she has a deep love affair with South Florida.

Source: homes.com

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Understanding Long-Term Care Insurance

  • Health Insurance

A lot of us don’t like to think about this, but inevitably there will come a time where we will all need help taking care of ourselves. So how can we start preparing for this financially?

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Many people opt to purchase long-term care insurance in advance as a way to prepare for their golden years. Long-term care insurance includes services relating to day-to-day activities such as help with taking baths, getting dressed and getting around the house. Most long-term care insurance policies will front the fees for this type of care if you are suffering from a chronic illness, injury or disability, like Alzheimer’s disease, for example. 

If this is something you think you’ll need later on, it’s crucial that you don’t wait until you’re sick to apply. If you apply for long-term care insurance after becoming ill or disabled, you will not qualify. Most people apply around the ages of 50-60 years old. 

In this article, we will discuss long-term care insurance, how it works and why you might consider getting it.   

How long-term care insurance works

The process of applying for long-term care insurance is pretty straight forward. Generally, you will have to fill out an application and then you’ll have to answer a series of questions about your health. During this point in the process, you may or may not have to submit medical records or other documents proving the status of your health. 

With most long-term care policies, you will get to choose between different plans depending on the amount of coverage you want. 

Many long-term care policies will deem you eligible for benefits once you are unable to do certain activities on your own. These activities are called “activities of daily living” or ADLs:

  • Bathing
  • Incontinence assistance
  • Dressing
  • Eating
  • Getting off and/or on the toilet
  • Getting in and out of a bed or other furniture

In most cases, you must be incapable of performing at least two of these activities on your own in order to qualify for long-term care. When it’s time for you to start receiving care, you will need to file a claim. Your insurer will review your application, records and make contact with your doctor to find out more about your condition. In some cases, the insurer will send a nurse to evaluate you before your claim gets approved. 

It’s very common for insurers to require an “elimination period” before they start reimbursing you for your care. What this means is that after you have been approved for benefits and started receiving regular care, you will need to pay out of pocket for your treatments for a period of anywhere from 30-90 days. After this period, you will get reimbursed for your out-of-pocket expenses and from there.

Who should consider long-term care insurance

Unfortunately, the statistics are against our odds when it comes to whether or not we will eventually need some type of long-term care. Approximately half of people in the U.S. at the age of 65 will eventually acquire a disability where they will need to receive long-term care insurance.  Of course, the problem is, long-term care can be really expensive. Unless you have insurance, you’ll be paying for your long-term care completely out-of-pocket should you ever need it.

Your standard health insurance plan, including Medicare, will not cover your long-term care. The benefits of buying long-term care insurance are that:

  • You can hold on to your savings: Many uninsured seniors have to dip into their savings account in order to pay for their long-term care. Because it’s not cheap, many of them drain their life savings just to be able to pay for it.
  • You’ll be able to choose from a larger variety of options: Being insured gives you the benefit of being able to choose the quality of care that you prefer. Just like with anything else, you get what you pay for when it comes to healthcare. Medicaid offers some help with long-term care, but you’ll end up in a government-funded nursing home. 

How to buy long-term care insurance

If you’ve recently started thinking about shopping for long term-care insurance, you’ll want to keep a few things in mind:

  • Do you mind being insured on a policy with an elimination period?
  • Can you afford all of the costs including living adjustments?
  • Are you interested in a policy that covers both you and your spouse, otherwise known as “shared care”?

There are a few different ways to go about getting long-term care benefits. You can either buy a policy from an insurance broker, an individual insurance company, or in some cases, your employer. Obtaining long-term care insurance through your employer is probably going to be cheaper than getting it as an individual. Ask your employer if it’s included in your benefits. 

Many people also opt to shop for hybrid benefits insurance policies. This is when a long-term care policy is packaged in with a standard life insurance policy. This is becoming a lot more common in the world of insurance. Keep in mind that the approval process may be slightly different for a hybrid insurance policy than of that of a stand-alone long-term care insurance policy. Make sure to ask about the requirements before you apply. 

Best long-term care insurance packages

There are not very many long-term care insurance companies that exist as there once was. It’s hard to wrap our heads around purchasing something that we don’t yet need. However, here are a few examples of companies that offer competitive long-term care packages:

  • Mutual of Omaha: This company offers benefits of anywhere between $1,500 and $10,000. While the main disadvantage of this company’s packages is that they do not cover doctor’s charges, transportation, personal expense, lab charges, or prescriptions, you CAN choose to receive cash benefits instead of reimbursements. This company also offers discounts for things like good health and marital status. This company’s insurance policies offer a wide range of options and add-ons so you can make sure that all your bases are covered.
  • Transamerica: This company’s long-term policy, TransCare III, is good if you don’t want to hassle with an elimination period. If you live in California, this may not be the best choice for you because California’s rates are a lot higher than the rates in other states. Your maximum daily benefit can be up to $500 with this program, with a total of anywhere between $18,250-$1,095,000. 
  • MassMutual: Popular for their SignatureCare 500 policy which comes in both base and comprehensive packages, is a long-term care and life insurance hybrid. This is very appealing to many seniors wanting to kill two birds with one stone. This company also has a 6-year period as one of their term options, which is pretty high.
  • Nationwide: This program sets itself apart from many other programs available because it allows you to have informal caregivers like family, friends, or neighbors. You will receive your entire cash benefit every month and it is up to you to disperse the funds as you would like. Currently, this company does not have their pricing available online, so you will need to speak with an agent to discuss prices.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

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How Much Is Enough For Retirement?

April 20, 2019 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Financial Advisor

If you’re thinking about how much is enough for retirement, you’re probably contemplating a retirement and need to know how to pay for it. If you are, that’s good because one of the challenges we face is how we’re going to fund our retirement.

Determining then how much retirement savings is enough depends on a number of factors, including your lifestyle and your current income. Either way, you want to make sure that you have plenty of money in your retirement savings so you don’t work too hard, or work at all, during your golden years.

If you’re already thinking about retirement and you’re not sure whether your savings is in good shape, it may make sense to speak with a financial advisor to help you set up a savings plan.

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How Much Is Enough For Retirement?

Your needs and expectations might be different in retirement than others. Because of that, there’s no magic number out there. In other words, how much is enough for retirement depends on a myriad of personal factors.

However, the conventional wisdom out there is that you should have $1 million to $1.5 million, or that your retirement savings should be 10 to 12 times your current income.

Even $1 million may not be enough to retire comfortably. According to a report from a major personal finance website, GoBankingRates, you could easily blow $1 million in as little as 12 years.

GoBankingRates concludes that a better way to figure out how long $1 million will last you largely depends on your state. For example, if you live in California, the report found, “$1 Million will last you 14 years, 3 months, 7 days.” Whereas if you live in Mississippi, “$1 Million will last you 23 years, 2 months, 2 days.” In other words, how much is enough for retirement largely depends on the state you reside.

For some, coming up with that much money to retire comfortably can be scary, especially if you haven’t saved any money for retirement, or, if your savings is not where it’s supposed to be.

Related topics:

How to Become a 401(k) Millionaire

Early Retirement: 7 Steps to Retire Early

5 Reasons Why You Will Retire Broke

Your current lifestyle and expected lifestyle?

What is your current lifestyle? To determine how much you need to save for retirement, you should determine how much your expenses are currently now and whether you intend to keep the current lifestyle during retirement.

So, if you’re making $110,000 and live off of $90,000, then multiply $90,000 by 20 ($1,800,000). With that number in mind, start working toward a retirement saving goals. However, if you intend to eat and spend lavishly during retirement, then you’ll obviously have to save more. And the same is true if you intend to reduce your expenses during retirement: you can save less money now.

The best way to start saving for retirement is to contribute to a tax-advantaged retirement account. It can be a Roth IRA, a traditional IRA or a 401(k) account. A 401k account should be your best choice, because the amount you can contribute every year is much more than a Roth IRA and traditional IRA.

1. See if you can max out your 401k. If you’re lucky enough to have a 401k plan at your job, you should contribute to it or max it out if you’re able to. The contribution limit for a 401k plan if you’re under 50 years old is $19,000 in 2019. If you’re funding a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA, the limit is $6,000. For more information, see How to Become a 401(k) Millionaire.

2. Automate your retirement savings. If you’re contributing to an employer 401k plan, that money automatically gets deducted from your paycheck. But if you’re funding a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA, you have to do it yourself. So set up an automatic deposit for your retirement account from a savings account. If your employer offers direct deposit, you can have a portion of your paycheck deposited directly into that savings account.

Related: The Best 5 Places For Your Savings Account.

Life expectancy

How long do you expect to live? Have your parents or grandparents lived through 80’s or 90’s or 100’s? If so, there is a chance you might live longer in retirement if you’re in good health. Therefore, you need to adjust your savings goal higher.

Consider seeking financial advice.

Saving money for retirement may not be your strong suit. Therefore, you may need to work with a financial advisor to boost your retirement income. For example, if you have a lot of money sitting in your retirement savings account, a financial advisor can help with investment options.

Bottom Line:

Figuring out how much is enough for retirement depends on how much retirement will cost you and what lifestyle you intend to have. Once you know the answer to these two questions, you can start working towards your savings goal.

How much money you will need in retirement? Use this retirement calculator below to determine whether you are on tract and determine how much you’ll need to save a month.

More on retirement:

Working With The Right Financial Advisor

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Source: growthrapidly.com

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How to Get Approved for Credit in a Financial Downturn

Source: goodfinancialcents.com

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Is Your Mortgage Forbearance Ending Soon? What To Do Next

Millions of Americans struggling to make their monthly mortgage payments because of COVID-19 have received relief through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.

But mortgage forbearance is only temporary, and set to expire soon, leaving many homeowners who are still struggling perplexed on what to do next.

Enacted in March, the CARES Act initially granted a 180-day forbearance, or pause in payments, to homeowners with mortgages backed by the federal government or a government-sponsored enterprise such as Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. Furthermore, some private lenders also granted mortgage forbearance of 90 days or more to financially distressed homeowners.

According to the Mortgage Bankers Association, 8.39% of loans were in forbearance as of June 28, representing an estimated 4.2 million homeowners nationwide.

So what are affected homeowners to do when the forbearance goes away? You have options, so it’s well worth contacting your lender to explore what’s best for you.

“If you know you’re going to be unable to meet the terms of your forbearance agreement at its maturity, you should call your loan servicer immediately and see what options they may be able to offer to you,” says Abel Carrasco, mortgage loan originator at Motto Mortgage Advisors in St. Petersburg, FL.

Exactly what’s available depends on the fine print in the terms of your mortgage forbearance agreement. Here’s an overview of some possible avenues to explore if you still can’t pay your mortgage after the forbearance period ends.

Extend your mortgage forbearance

One simple option is to contact your lender to request an extension.

Homeowners granted forbearance under the CARES Act can request a 180-day extension, giving them a total of 360 days of forbearance, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The key is to contact your lender well before your forbearance expires. If you let it expire without an extension, your lender could impose penalties.

“If you just stop making regular, scheduled payments, you could have a late mortgage payment on your credit,” warns Carrasco. “That could severely impact refinancing or purchasing another property in the immediate future and potentially subject you to foreclosure.”

Keep in mind, though, a forbearance simply delays payments, meaning they’ll still need to be made in the future. It doesn’t mean payments are forgiven.

Refinance to lower your mortgage payment

Mortgage interest rates are at all-time lows, hovering around 3%. So if you can swing it, this may be a great time to refinance your home, says Tendayi Kapfidze, chief economist at LendingTree.

Refinancing could come with some hefty fees, however, ranging from 2% to 6% of your loan amount. But it could be worth it.

A lower interest rate will likely lower your monthly payment and save you thousands over the life of your mortgage. Dropping your interest rate from 4.125% to 3% could save more than $40,000 over 30 years, for example, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

“Lenders have tightened standards, though, so you will need to show that you are a good candidate for refinancing,” Kapfidze says. You’ll need a good credit score of 620 or higher.

As long as you’ve kept up your end of the forbearance terms, having a mortgage forbearance shouldn’t affect your credit score, or your ability to refinance or qualify for another mortgage.

Ask for a loan modification

Many lenders are offering an assortment of programs to help homeowners under hardship because of the pandemic, says Christopher Sailus, vice president and mortgage product manager at WaFd Bank.

“Lenders quickly recognized the severity of the economic situation due to the pandemic, and put programs into place to defer payments or help reduce them,” he says.

A loan modification is one such option. This enables homeowners at risk of default to change the terms of their original mortgage—such as payment amount, interest rate, or length of the loan—to reduce monthly payments and clear up any delinquencies.

Loan modifications may affect your credit score, but not as much as a foreclosure. Some lenders charge fees for loan modifications, but others, like WaFd, provide them at no cost.

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Watch: 5 Things to Know About Selling a Home Amid the Pandemic

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Put your home on the market

It may seem like a strange time to sell your home, with COVID-19 cases growing, unemployment rising, and the economy on shaky ground. But, it’s actually a great time to sell a house.

Pending home sales jumped 44.3% in May, according to the National Association of Realtors®’ Pending Home Sales Index, the largest month-over-month growth since the index began in 2001.

Home inventory remains low, and buyer demand is up with many hoping to jump on the low interest rates. Prices are up, too. The national median home price increased 7.7% in the first quarter of 2020, to $274,600, according to NAR.

So if you can no longer afford your home and have plenty of equity built up, listing your home may be a smart move. (Home equity is the market value of your home minus how much you still owe on your mortgage.)

Consider foreclosure as a last resort

Foreclosure may be the only option for many homeowners, especially if you fall too behind on your mortgage payments and can’t afford to sell or refinance. In May, more than 7% of mortgages were delinquent, a 20% increase from April, according to mortgage data and analytics firm Black Knight.

“When to begin a foreclosure process will vary from lender to lender and client to client,” Sailus says. “Current and future state and federal legislation, statutes, or regulations will impact the process, as will the individual homeowner’s situation and their ability to repay.”

Foreclosures won’t begin until after a forbearance period ends, he adds.

The CARES Act prohibited lenders from foreclosing on mortgages backed by the government or government-sponsored enterprise until at least Aug. 31. Several states, including California and Connecticut, also issued temporary foreclosure moratoriums and stays.

Once these grace periods (and forbearance timelines) end, and homeowners miss payments, they could face foreclosure, Carrasco says. When a loan is flagged as being in foreclosure, the balance is due and legal fees accumulate, requiring homeowners to pay off the loan (usually by selling) and vacating the property.

“Absent participation in an agreed-upon forbearance, deferment, repayment plan, or loan modification, loan servicers historically may begin the foreclosure process after as few as three months of missed mortgage payments,” he explains. “This is unfortunately often the point of no return.”

For more smart financial news and advice, head over to MarketWatch.

Source: realtor.com

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An Eye-Opening Timeline of Tarek El Moussa’s Own Homes, From His First to Where He Lives Today

Tarek El Moussa is known for his impressive home renovations on his HGTV shows “Flip or Flop” and “Flipping 101 With Tarek El Moussa.” But what are his own homes like?

That depends, since this 39-year-old reality TV star has purchased, and rented, quite a few properties for his personal use over the years.

Each reflected where he was in life at the time, whether he was single (when his home had a shark tank), married to Christina Anstead (time to upgrade to a massive family mansion), divorced (hello, “dadchelor” pad!), or starting fresh with his fiancée, Heather Rae Young.

For a good look at how life changes can affect the home you have, check out this timeline of El Moussa’s many homes through the years, and how much his tastes have evolved.

Early 2000s: Tarek El Moussa’s first home

Even El Moussa had to start somewhere! Back when this HGTV star was just 21, he bought his first home—and spent way more than he expected. He set out to find a house for around $400,000, but ended up falling in love with a home that was listed for over $800,000.

“It was the perfect bachelor pad—1,400 square feet, massive master bedroom, man cave all to myself, and coolest of all, a 300-gallon shark tank—may I remind you I was 21 at that time?” he wrote for realtor.com®.

Let’s just say that El Moussa’s first home was a huge life lesson for him that you should never bite off more than you can chew—financially or otherwise.

“I was very, very broke,” he admitted. “With no money for furniture, I ended up living in an empty house for nearly nine months.”

2013–18: El Moussa’s first family home with Christina Anstead

This Yorba Linda, CA, mansion was Tarek El Moussa and Christina Anstead's family home when they were married.
This Yorba Linda, CA, mansion was Tarek El Moussa and Christina Anstead’s family home when they were married.

realtor.com

By 2013, El Moussa was married to Christina Anstead, and they had their daughter, Taylor, so they needed a bigger family house. The couple’s hit TV show, “Flip or Flop,” had completed its first season, so they had the cash to upgrade.

El Moussa and Anstead did a lot of work on their backyard.
El Moussa and Anstead did a lot of work on their backyard.

realtor.com

And upgrade they did: El Moussa and Anstead’s home in Yorba Linda, CA, was purchased for an even $2 million at the end of 2013.

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Watch: Kate Gosselin Vacates Her ‘Kate Plus 8’ Pad

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With six bedrooms and 6.5 bathrooms, this property was already impressive, but the couple ended up spending an additional $1.5 million to improve the property, turning the backyard into an oasis, with a gorgeous dining area, swanky pool, and fire features.

El Moussa and Anstead lounge at home in a Season 4 episode of "Flip or Flop."
El Moussa and Anstead lounge at home in a Season 4 episode of “Flip or Flop.”

HGTV

Despite all that renovation equity sweat, when the pair split in 2018, they sold the house at a loss, accepting an offer for just $2,995,000—proving that renovations don’t always pay off.

2017: El Moussa’s Bad Decisions houseboat

Originally, El Moussa and Anstead bought this yacht together, naming it Flip or Flop. But soon after they separated, El Moussa pointedly renamed it Bad Decisions.

The boat, which cost almost $1 million, has two bedrooms and two bathrooms—making it virtually as spacious as some of his flips.

With teak flooring and cedar-lined closets, the boat is stylish, and it has a kitchen and a washer and dryer. It is also convertible and can either be left open to the ocean breezes, or closed up so that the heater or air conditioning can make the ride more comfortable.

As it turns out, this boat played an important part in El Moussa’s meeting his fiancée in Newport Beach, CA.

“His boat was parked next to the boat I was on,” Young explained on Netflix’s “Selling Sunset.” “And my girlfriend happened to be on his boat.”

She jumped aboard, she recounted, and El Moussa turned around.

“And he was, like, ‘Hi, I’m Tarek,’” she said. “Then we were just, like, texting and kept in touch.”

2018–20: El Moussa’s postdivorce ‘dadchelor’ pad

El Moussa's "dadchelor" pad
El Moussa’s “dadchelor” pad

realtor.com

After El Moussa and Anstead split, El Moussa moved into a four-bedroom “dadchelor” pad”  in Costa Mesa, CA. A good mix of family-friendly and all-El Moussa—without Anstead’s feminine touches—it was only a couple of blocks from his ex-wife’s place, making shared custody of their kids much simpler.

The home had a pool, spa, and outdoor dining space. The interior was styled in bold colors, making it homey but masculine. With a modern fireplace and high ceilings, the space was perfect for El Moussa.

April 2020: El Moussa and Young’s first rental together

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By April this year, El Moussa and Young were ready to move in together. They rented a snazzy Newport Beach home, just a block from the ocean. El Moussa and Young’s home had fun swivel chairs, a dining table perfect for a family of four, and lots of family photos.

This rental was temporary, but these two certainly looked comfortable!

September 2020: El Moussa’s beachside fixer-upper

Of course, Young and El Moussa didn’t plan to rent forever, and in September, they bought a home in Newport Beach. Originally, El Moussa bought this house to flip, but after he proposed in July, they decided it would make a great home for both of them.

Unfortunately, it looks as if it will be a while before these lovebirds can move in to their new abode.

In November, El Moussa reported that his new house had flooded. “Ugh, when it rains it pours! We are now way behind schedule and way over budget lol,” he said.

It may take some work to get this place ready, but if El Moussa has proved anything, it’s that he can roll with the punches and is always up for a challenge—with his homes or otherwise.

Source: realtor.com

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