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Can Adding a Pool Increase Your Home Value?

On scorching hot days, there’s nothing like taking a dip in a swimming pool. In some areas of the country, a swimming pool is close to a necessity. In fact, there are 10.6 million swimming pools across the U.S., with 3,000,000 of those in California alone. From in-ground to above-ground, chlorine to saltwater, there are numerous styles, sizes, and prices of swimming pools. And while having a swimming pool just steps from your back door may sound appealing, is it really a good economical choice and does it increase your home’s value? There are a lot of factors to consider before adding a swimming pool, or even before buying a home with an existing swimming pool.

installing a pool at homeinstalling a pool at home

The Cost To Install

While having a pool sounds like a great way to be the life of the party when hosting friends and family during warm months, it can be pricey. And as with most large purchases many people finance the addition. The average cost to build an inground swimming pool is $35,000, with most spending between $28,000 to $55,000 for the initial investment. Of course, the amount of site work, soil type, and additional finishes can greatly impact the cost of a swimming pool. For many, the equivalent of a new car is worth the enjoyment a swimming pool would bring.

The Cost To Maintain

The costs associated with maintaining a swimming vary based on location, size, and type. According to Michelle Sbabo, co-owner of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa, homeowners can “expect to spend a minimum of $500 per summer on chemicals and supplies – plus at least a couple of hours a week testing water, adjusting chemicals, brushing, vacuuming, cleaning filters, netting, and emptying skimmer and filter baskets.” Depending on the type of swimming pool, average annual maintenance costs can vary from $375 to over $2,750. When choosing the type of swimming pool, it’s important to inquire with a local pool maintenance company what to reasonably expect in annual maintenance costs.

Read: Tips for Selecting Above-ground Pool Equipment

The Cost To Open and Close A Pool

For some parts of the country, swimming pools can remain open year-round; however, in colder climates, homeowners must close swimming pools to prevent damage from cold weather. According to Sbabo, “Closing a pool will run $200-300 for a standard pool, more with complex equipment and plumbing. Opening a pool is roughly the same cost as closing – unless the pool is extremely green or dirty and requires more time and chemicals to clean up.”

pool at housepool at house

How Your Geographic Location Affects Your Investment

Michelle Sbabo of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa also explains that “The contents of source water also affect pool water care. In many parts of the country, for example, the water is very high in calcium and other minerals. This can cause scaling on pool surfaces and inside equipment, and water must be treated appropriately to minimize scale damage. Additionally, weather and environment greatly impact pool care. Pools in areas with a lot of rain or wind may need a greater range of chemicals to address contaminants that enter the pool. And certain plants and trees can cause maintenance issues.”

Read: Tips for Landscaping Around a Pool

How A Swimming Pool Affects Homeowner’s Insurance

Once a swimming pool is on a property, the chance for injury or death increases which is why homeowner’s insurance increases with a pool. According to Zack’s Investment Research, insurance companies typically require an increased liability coverage, sometimes up to half a million dollars, and some even encourage additional umbrella policies. There are ways to keep premiums at a reasonable rate by installing a locking gate around the pool, keeping the pool covered with a safety tarp, adding motion sensors to the pool, and even cameras surrounding the pool.

…But Will A Pool Add To Your Home’s Value?

One of the important things to remember: swimming pools aren’t for everyone. So just by the mere fact that a pool is on the property, there will be a group of potential home buyers that will not be interested. However, the bottom-line answer is: it depends. For some geographic areas (like Southern Florida or California), a swimming pool can certainly increase appeal- and value. However, in areas like Michigan or Northern states, they may have less desirability and the pool could appraise for less than the install price. However, a recent study by LendingTree shows that homes with a pool are valued at 54% higher than those without one.

Tips From The Expert

Michelle Sbabo, co-owner of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa offers a few tips for those thinking of adding a pool or buying a home with an existing pool.

  • Most home inspections don’t include the pool. If the buyer is new to pools, it’s a good idea to hire a pool pro to check the equipment and understand any potential expenses.
  • Contact a local pool maintenance company to teach you how to care for a pool. Many new pool owners greatly benefit from a “private pool lesson”.
  • Check into a Home Warranty that covers pool equipment. We have seen major equipment expenses covered by good warranty programs with only a small deductible out of pocket.


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Jennifer is an accidental house flipper turned Realtor and real estate investor. She is the voice behind the blog, Bachelorette Pad Flip. Over five years, Jennifer paid off $70,000 in student loan debt through real estate investing. She’s passionate about the power of real estate. She’s also passionate about southern cooking, good architecture, and thrift store treasure hunting. She calls Northwest Arkansas home with her cat Smokey, but she has a deep love affair with South Florida.

Source: homes.com

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Buying A Second Home? 8 Things To Consider

Buying a second home is a major expense. You might have several reasons for wanting to buy a second house. Perhaps, you’re buying a second home for vacations or weekend getaways. Or, it might be that you want to use it as a rental property for rental income. However, there are things to consider before buying a second home.

The benefits of buying a second home

If you’re buying a second home for rental income, you’ll benefit from many perks, especially tax advantages.

For example, you will be able to deduct interest, property taxes, homeowners insurance and other expenses against the property’s income.

Even if the value of the property declines, you will still be able to deduct depreciation from your taxes.

While these benefits are great, the mortgage requirements for a second home are much stricter than for a mortgage on your primary residence. So, make sure you can afford it.

8 Things To Consider When Buying A Second Home

1. Financing options: When you bought your first home, you had available to you what’s called an FHA loan – a government loan program.

FHA loans are an appealing and favorite choice among first time home buyers due to their relatively low down payment requirement.

FHA loans require a 3.5% down payment and a relatively low credit score of 580. However, FHA loans are not available to second home buyers.

That is because FHA requires the home to be the borrower’s primary residence. So, if you’re thinking of buying a second home, you will need to either use a conventional loan or financing it with your own cash.

2. A larger down payment: If you’re using a conventional loan for your second home, you will need to come up with a larger down payment.

Lenders for a conventional loan usually requires a 20% down payment of the home purchase price.

But for a second home which will be used as a rental property or vacation home, expect lenders to ask for 30% or even 35%.

3. A higher credit score. For an FHA loan, you only need a credit score of 580 to qualify. But for a conventional loan on a second home, you will need much higher credit score — usually 750 or higher.

4. Expect a Higher Interest Rate: Lenders will likely charge you a higher interest rate on your second home than your primary residence.

The reason is because they see a second home — be it a vacation home or a rental property — as riskier. They feel that you are more likely to default on a mortgage on your second home than on your primary residence.

5. Do your research: Just as you did your homework when you bought your place to live in, buying a second home is no different.

In fact, you’ll need to spend more time researching rental property. That means researching the neighborhood you will want to invest in, knowing the zoning laws for a particular area, the sales price for the homes in the area.

You will need to know if the area has adequate public transportation, schools, grocery shopping, etc,– things that potential tenants will need.

6. Be prepared to be a landlord: if you’re buying a second home to rent, be prepared to be a landlord.

And be prepared to deal with all of the headaches that come with being a landlord. Do you have sufficient time? Can you deal with problems?

Owning a rental property and being a landlord is time consuming. It is also hard hard work and you have to do your due diligence.

You can hire a property manager to run the property for you. But if that is not feasible, you’ll have to do it yourself.

That means, screening new tenants, collecting rent, dealing with delinquent tenants, fixing problems in the property, such as a broken pipe.

So before buying a second home, make sure you have sufficient time and make sure you can deal with the day-to-day headaches that come with being a landlord.

7. Do you have a stable income? Dealing with a second mortgage on your second home is doable.

While you may be able to afford upfront costs, if you don’t have a stable income, you may have to think twice about whether it is a good idea.

Plus, you still have to consider the additional expenses of owning a second home such as insurance, property taxes, maintenance, repairs, property management fees, etc.

8. Are you out of credit card debt? If you have paid off outstanding and high interest credit card debts, then purchasing a second home may make sense.

But if you’re still struggling to pay your debt, you may need to put buying a second home on hold. 

The bottom line

If you’re thinking about buying a second home, whether it is for investment or vacation, be prepared to save some money, budget for expenses, and come up with a bigger down payment.

More importantly, spend as much time, if not more, researching for the home just as you did when your purchased your primary home.

Speak with the Right Financial Advisor

  • If you have questions about your finances, you can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is making more money, paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc).
  • Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Source: growthrapidly.com

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8 Safe Investments for People Who Hate Risking Their Money

Think back to what the stock market looked like to you in March 2020, aka, the apocalypse. Did it look like:

A.) The biggest bargain sale you’ve ever seen in your lifetime? 

or

B.) A burning pit of money that was about to incinerate your life’s savings?

If you answered “B,” you probably have a low risk tolerance. You worry more about losing money than missing out on the opportunity to make more of it.

Being cautious about how you invest your money is a good thing. But if you’re so risk-averse that you avoid investing altogether, you’re putting your money at greater risk than you think.

Do Safe Investments Actually Exist?

When you think about the risks of investing, you probably think about losing principal, i.e., the original amount you invested. If you keep your money in a bank account, there’s virtually no chance of that happening because deposits of up to $250,000 are FDIC insured. 

But consider that the average savings account pays just 0.05% APY, while in 2019, inflation was about 2.3%.

So while you’re not at risk of losing principal, you still face purchasing power risk, which is the risk that your money loses value. Your money needs to earn enough to keep up with inflation to avoid losing purchasing power. If inflation continues at 2.3%, buying $100 worth of groceries will cost you $102.30 a year from now. If you’re saving over decades toward retirement, you’ll be able to buy a whole lot less groceries in your golden years.

There’s also the risk of missed opportunity. By playing it too safe, you’re unlikely to earn the returns you need to grow into a sufficient nest egg.

Though there’s no such thing as a risk-free investment, there are plenty of safe ways to invest your money.

8 Low-Risk Investments for People Who Hate Losing Money

Here are eight options that are good for conservative investors. (Spoiler: Gold, bitcoin and penny stocks did not make our list.

1. CDs

If you have cash you won’t need for a while, investing in a CD, or certificate of deposit, is a good way to earn more interest than you’d get with a regular bank account.

You get a fixed interest rate as long as you don’t withdraw your money before the maturity date. Typically, the longer the duration, the higher the interest rate. 

Since they’re FDIC insured, CDs are among the safest investments in existence. But low risk translates to low rewards. Those low interest rates for borrowers translate to lower APYs for money we save at a bank. Even for five-year CDs, the best APYs are just over 1%.

You also risk losing your interest and even some principal if you need to withdraw money early.

2. Money Market Funds

Not to be confused with money market accounts, money market funds are actually mutual funds that invest in low-risk, short-term debts, such as CDs and U.S. Treasurys. (More on those shortly.)

The returns are often on par with CD interest rates. One advantage: It’s a liquid investment, which means you can cash out at any time. But because they aren’t FDIC insured, they can technically lose principal, though they’re considered extraordinarily safe.

3. Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS)

The U.S. government finances its debt by issuing Treasurys. When you buy Treasurys, you’re investing in bonds backed by the “full faith and credit of the U.S. government.” Unless the federal government defaults on its debt for the first time in history, investors get paid.

The price of that safety: pathetically low yields that often don’t keep up with inflation.

TIPS offer built-in inflation protection — as the name “Treasury Inflation Protected Securities” implies. Available in five-, 10- and 30-year increments, their principal is adjusted based on changes to the Consumer Price Index. The twice-a-year interest payments are adjusted accordingly, as well.

If your principal is $1,000 and the CPI showed inflation of 3%, your new principal is $1,030, and your interest payment is based on the adjusted amount. 

On the flip side, if there’s deflation, your principal is adjusted downward.

4. Municipal Bonds

Municipal bonds, or “munis,” are bonds issued by a state or local government. They’re popular with retirees because the income they generate is tax-free at the federal level. Sometimes when you buy muni bonds in your state, the state doesn’t tax them either.

There are two basic types of munis: General obligation bonds, which are issued for general public works projects, and revenue bonds, which are backed by specific projects, like a hospital or toll road.

General obligation bonds have the lowest risk because the issuing government pledges to raise taxes if necessary to make sure bondholders get paid. With revenue bonds, bondholders get paid from the income generated by the project, so there’s a higher risk of default.

5. Investment-Grade Bonds

Bonds issued by corporations are inherently riskier than bonds issued by governments, because even a stable corporation is at higher risk of defaulting on its debt. But you can mitigate the risks by choosing investment-grade bonds, which are issued by corporations with good to excellent credit ratings.

Because investment-grade bonds are low risk, the yields are low compared to higher-risk “junk bonds.” That’s because corporations with low credit ratings have to pay investors more to compensate them for the extra risk.

6. Target-Date Funds

When you compare bonds vs. stocks, bonds are generally safer, while stocks offer more growth. That’s why as a general rule, your retirement portfolio starts out mostly invested in stocks and then gradually allocates more to bonds.

Target-date funds make that reallocation automatic. They’re commonly found in 401(k)s, IRAs and 529 plans. You choose the date that’s closest to the year you plan to retire or send your child to college. Then the fund gradually shifts more toward safer investments, like bonds and money market funds as that date gets nearer.

7. Total Market ETFs

While having a small percentage of your money in super low-risk investments like CDs,

money market funds and Treasurys is OK, there really is no avoiding the stock market if

you want your money to grow.

If you’re playing day trader, the stock market is a risky place. But when you’re committed to investing in stocks for the long haul, you’re way less exposed to risk. While downturns can cause you to lose money in the short term, the stock market historically ticks upward over time.

A total stock market exchange-traded fund will invest you in hundreds or thousands of companies. Usually, they reflect the makeup of a major stock index, like the Wilshire 5000. If the stock market is up 5%, you’d expect your investment to be up by roughly the same amount. Same goes for if the market drops 5%.

By investing in a huge range of companies, you get an instantly diversified portfolio, which is far less risky than picking your own stocks.

8. Dividend Stocks

If you opt to invest in individual companies, sticking with dividend-paying stock is a smart move. When a company’s board of directors votes to approve a dividend, they’re redistributing part of the profit back to investors.

Dividends are commonly offered by companies that are stable and have a track record of earning a profit. Younger companies are less likely to offer a dividend because they need to reinvest their profits. They have more growth potential, but they’re also a higher risk because they’re less-established.

The best part: Many companies allow shareholders to automatically reinvest their dividends, which means even more compound returns.

Robin Hartill is a certified financial planner and a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder. She writes the Dear Penny personal finance advice column. Send your tricky money questions to [email protected]

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Source: thepennyhoarder.com

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Understanding Long-Term Care Insurance

  • Health Insurance

A lot of us don’t like to think about this, but inevitably there will come a time where we will all need help taking care of ourselves. So how can we start preparing for this financially?

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Many people opt to purchase long-term care insurance in advance as a way to prepare for their golden years. Long-term care insurance includes services relating to day-to-day activities such as help with taking baths, getting dressed and getting around the house. Most long-term care insurance policies will front the fees for this type of care if you are suffering from a chronic illness, injury or disability, like Alzheimer’s disease, for example. 

If this is something you think you’ll need later on, it’s crucial that you don’t wait until you’re sick to apply. If you apply for long-term care insurance after becoming ill or disabled, you will not qualify. Most people apply around the ages of 50-60 years old. 

In this article, we will discuss long-term care insurance, how it works and why you might consider getting it.   

How long-term care insurance works

The process of applying for long-term care insurance is pretty straight forward. Generally, you will have to fill out an application and then you’ll have to answer a series of questions about your health. During this point in the process, you may or may not have to submit medical records or other documents proving the status of your health. 

With most long-term care policies, you will get to choose between different plans depending on the amount of coverage you want. 

Many long-term care policies will deem you eligible for benefits once you are unable to do certain activities on your own. These activities are called “activities of daily living” or ADLs:

  • Bathing
  • Incontinence assistance
  • Dressing
  • Eating
  • Getting off and/or on the toilet
  • Getting in and out of a bed or other furniture

In most cases, you must be incapable of performing at least two of these activities on your own in order to qualify for long-term care. When it’s time for you to start receiving care, you will need to file a claim. Your insurer will review your application, records and make contact with your doctor to find out more about your condition. In some cases, the insurer will send a nurse to evaluate you before your claim gets approved. 

It’s very common for insurers to require an “elimination period” before they start reimbursing you for your care. What this means is that after you have been approved for benefits and started receiving regular care, you will need to pay out of pocket for your treatments for a period of anywhere from 30-90 days. After this period, you will get reimbursed for your out-of-pocket expenses and from there.

Who should consider long-term care insurance

Unfortunately, the statistics are against our odds when it comes to whether or not we will eventually need some type of long-term care. Approximately half of people in the U.S. at the age of 65 will eventually acquire a disability where they will need to receive long-term care insurance.  Of course, the problem is, long-term care can be really expensive. Unless you have insurance, you’ll be paying for your long-term care completely out-of-pocket should you ever need it.

Your standard health insurance plan, including Medicare, will not cover your long-term care. The benefits of buying long-term care insurance are that:

  • You can hold on to your savings: Many uninsured seniors have to dip into their savings account in order to pay for their long-term care. Because it’s not cheap, many of them drain their life savings just to be able to pay for it.
  • You’ll be able to choose from a larger variety of options: Being insured gives you the benefit of being able to choose the quality of care that you prefer. Just like with anything else, you get what you pay for when it comes to healthcare. Medicaid offers some help with long-term care, but you’ll end up in a government-funded nursing home. 

How to buy long-term care insurance

If you’ve recently started thinking about shopping for long term-care insurance, you’ll want to keep a few things in mind:

  • Do you mind being insured on a policy with an elimination period?
  • Can you afford all of the costs including living adjustments?
  • Are you interested in a policy that covers both you and your spouse, otherwise known as “shared care”?

There are a few different ways to go about getting long-term care benefits. You can either buy a policy from an insurance broker, an individual insurance company, or in some cases, your employer. Obtaining long-term care insurance through your employer is probably going to be cheaper than getting it as an individual. Ask your employer if it’s included in your benefits. 

Many people also opt to shop for hybrid benefits insurance policies. This is when a long-term care policy is packaged in with a standard life insurance policy. This is becoming a lot more common in the world of insurance. Keep in mind that the approval process may be slightly different for a hybrid insurance policy than of that of a stand-alone long-term care insurance policy. Make sure to ask about the requirements before you apply. 

Best long-term care insurance packages

There are not very many long-term care insurance companies that exist as there once was. It’s hard to wrap our heads around purchasing something that we don’t yet need. However, here are a few examples of companies that offer competitive long-term care packages:

  • Mutual of Omaha: This company offers benefits of anywhere between $1,500 and $10,000. While the main disadvantage of this company’s packages is that they do not cover doctor’s charges, transportation, personal expense, lab charges, or prescriptions, you CAN choose to receive cash benefits instead of reimbursements. This company also offers discounts for things like good health and marital status. This company’s insurance policies offer a wide range of options and add-ons so you can make sure that all your bases are covered.
  • Transamerica: This company’s long-term policy, TransCare III, is good if you don’t want to hassle with an elimination period. If you live in California, this may not be the best choice for you because California’s rates are a lot higher than the rates in other states. Your maximum daily benefit can be up to $500 with this program, with a total of anywhere between $18,250-$1,095,000. 
  • MassMutual: Popular for their SignatureCare 500 policy which comes in both base and comprehensive packages, is a long-term care and life insurance hybrid. This is very appealing to many seniors wanting to kill two birds with one stone. This company also has a 6-year period as one of their term options, which is pretty high.
  • Nationwide: This program sets itself apart from many other programs available because it allows you to have informal caregivers like family, friends, or neighbors. You will receive your entire cash benefit every month and it is up to you to disperse the funds as you would like. Currently, this company does not have their pricing available online, so you will need to speak with an agent to discuss prices.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

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How to Budget Groceries: 11 Easy Tips

Have you ever sat down to go over your budget only to find out that you’ve outrageously overspent on food? Local, organic, artisan goods and trendy new restaurant outings with friends make it easy to do. With food being the second highest household expense behind mortgage or rent, our food choices have a huge impact on our budget. Using this monthly budget calculator can also help guide how to budget for food. 

You may be surprised to find out that the most nutrient-dense foods are often the most budget-friendly. It’s not only possible, but fun and easy to eat nourishing, delicious food while still sticking to your budget. Here are 11 ways to help you learn how to budget groceries.

1. Track Current Spending

Before you figure out what you should be spending on food, it’s important to figure out what you are spending on food. Keep grocery store receipts to get a realistic picture of your current spending habits. If you feel inclined, create a spreadsheet to break down your spending by category, including beverages, produce, etc. Once you’ve done this, you can get an idea of where to trim down spending.

2. Allocate a Percentage of Your Income

How much each household spends on food varies based on income level and how many people need to be fed. Consider using a grocery calculator if you’re not sure where to start. While people spent about 30 percent of their income on food in 1950, this percentage has dropped to 9–12 today. Consider allocating 10 percent of your income to food as a starting point, and increase from there if necessary.

3. Avoid Eating Out

This is the least fun tip, we promise. Eating out is a quick and easy way to ruin your food budget. If you’re actively dating or enjoy going out to eat with friends, be sure to factor restaurants into your food budget — and strictly adhere to your limit. Coffee drinkers, consider making your favorite concoctions at home.

4. Plan Your Meals

It’s much easier to stick to a budget when you have a plan. Plus, having a purpose for each grocery item you buy will ensure nothing goes to waste or just sits in your pantry unused. Don’t be afraid of simple salads or meatless Mondays. Not every meal has to be a gourmet, grandiose experience.

5. Keep a Fridge Grocery List

Keep a magnetized grocery list on your fridge so that you can replace items as needed. This ensures you’re buying food you know you’ll eat because you’re already used to buying it. Sticking to a list in the grocery store is an effective way to keep yourself accountable and not spend money on processed or pricey items — there’s no need to take a stroll down the candy aisle if it’s not on the list.

6. Eat Before You Go to the Store

If your mother gave you this advice growing up, she was onto something: according to a survey, shoppers spend an average of 64 percent more when hungry. Sticking to a budget is all about eliminating temptations, so plan to eat beforehand to eliminate tantalizing foods that will cause you to go over-budget.

7. Be Careful with Coupons

50 percent off ketchup is a great deal — unless you don’t need ketchup. Beware of coupons that claim you’ll “save” money. If the item isn’t on your list, you’re not saving at all, but rather spending on something you don’t truly need. This discretion is key to saving money at the grocery store.

8. Embrace the Bulk Section

Not only is the bulk section of your grocery store great for cheap, filling staples, but it’s also the perfect way to discover new foods and bring variety into your diet. Take the time to compare the price of buying pre-packaged goods versus bulk — it’s almost always cheaper to buy in bulk, plus eliminating unnecessary packaging is good for the planet.

Bonus: a diet rich in unprocessed, whole plant foods provides virtually every nutrient, ensuring optimal health and keeping you from spending an excess amount on healthcare costs.

9. Bring Lunch to Work

Picture this: you’re trying to stick to a strict food budget, and one day at work you realize it’s lunchtime and you’re hungry. But alas, you forgot to pack a lunch. All the meal planning and smart shopping in the world won’t solve the work-lunch-dilemma. Brown-bagging your lunch is key to ensuring your food budget is successful. Plus, it can be fun! Think mason jar salads and Thai curry bowls.

10. Love Your Leftovers

Would you ever consider throwing $640 cash into the trash? This is what the average American household does every year — only instead of cash, it’s $640 worth of food that’s wasted. With millions of undernourished people around the globe, throwing away food not only hurts our budget but is a waste of the world’s resources. Tossing food is no joke. Eat your leftovers.

11. Freeze Foods That Are Going Bad

To avoid wasting food, freeze things that look like they’re about to go bad. Fruit that’s past its prime can be frozen and used in smoothies. Make double batches of soups, sauces, and baked goods so you’ll always have an alternative to ordering takeout when you don’t feel like cooking.

Sticking to a food budget takes planning and discipline. While it may not seem fun at first, you’ll likely find that you enjoy cooking and trying a variety of new foods you wouldn’t have thought to use before. Being resourceful and cooking healthfully is a skill that will benefit your wallet and waistline for years to come.

Sources: Turbo | Fool | Forbes | Medical Daily | GO Banking Rates | Value Penguin

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Source: mint.intuit.com

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How to Make $30,000 a Month Flipping Houses

I have flipped more than 200 houses in my career and while I love flipping, it is not easy! We have flipped 26 houses per year multiple times, and I can truly say that the more houses you flip, the more problems you have. Now, when I say house flipping, I am talking about buying houses, remodeling them, and selling them. Some people say they “flip houses” when they are wholesaling, which is buying and selling houses very quickly without remodeling them. Over the years, I have made $30,000 a month flipping houses and even more. It takes money, a team, and thick skin to make that kind of money, but it is not impossible by any means.

How much can you make on a single house flip?

I have written articles like this before and I love to break down the numbers to see how to actually do this, not just live in a fantasy world where good thoughts allow money to fall into your lap. I am also a fan of good thoughts, but that is not all it takes! The last article I wrote in this format was how to make $10,000 a month with rental properties. I love rentals and to be honest, I prefer rentals over flips, but flips allow me to buy more rentals.

I buy flips from $100,000 to $300,000 and they tend to make me from $20,000 to $50,000 per flip. I have made $100,000 or more on a flip before and I have also lost money on flips before. For the most part, I want to make at least $30,000 on every flip I do. That also makes this article really easy to write. If you want to make $30,000 a month flipping houses, flip one house a month. There the article is done!

While that math is simple, the task of flipping one house a month is not simple. Flipping one house can be tough let alone 12 ina year. We have done more and will continue to do more but it was not easy to get to this point. You can see a video of one of my best and most interesting flips below:

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Why is flipping houses hard?

A lot of people watch the house flipping television shows and think flipping is like what they see on TV. You buy a house, change the floorplan, decide what are the best design choices, and boom you make $50,000 or $100,000. The reality of flipping is much different from the television shows. Here is a break down of how it actually works:

  • Line up financing: Most people do not have the cash to flip houses so they borrow money from hard money lenders, friends, or the bank.
  • Find the deals: There are a lot of people who want to flip houses. The deals are not just sitting there for anyone to buy who wants to make $50,000. It takes a lot of work and patience to find the deals from the MLS, wholesalers, auctions, direct marketing, etc.
  • Find contractors: I do not do any of the work on house flips myself. I use contractors and subcontractors to handle it all. If you want to make $30,000 a month flipping houses you will need to hire contractors as well. Finding decent people to work on the houses is one of the toughest parts of the business.
  • Decide on what to repair: On TV, they usually go all out making tons of repairs to properties because that is what gets attention. In reality, the goal is to make only the repairs that are needed to sell the house. The bigger the remodel, the longer it takes and usually the less money you make.
  • Manage the repair process: Things rarely go as planned so someone has to manage the repair process and make sure the work is being done on time and the right way. Some of the biggest disasters come when a flipper trusts their contractor without oversite and huge mistakes are made or no work is being done.
  • Sell the house: It is not always easy to sell flips either. I am a real estate broker and list my flips for sale on the MLS. It is in almost everyone’s best interest to use an agent to sell their houses which cost money. You also need to make sure the home is clean, the work is completely done, and possibly stage the home.

Many things can go wrong during a flip and even experienced flippers like myself sometimes lose money. You have to stay on top of things and constantly tweak the business model. Materials are always getting more expensive as is labor and other costs. We are always finding new ways to get better deals in order to keep that same amount of profit.

To get that $30,000 average profit on a house everything needs to run smoothly and you need to assume there will be extra costs along they want that you are not accounting for.

My book Fix and Flip Your Way to Financial Freedom (197 reviews) goes over the ins and outs of flipping and how to actually do what I talk about in this article. It is on Amazon as an ebook, paperback, and audiobook. 

How much money do you need to flip houses?

Another roadblock for many investors is finding enough money to flip houses, especially if they have a lot of deals at once. There are lenders who will finance flips but the investors almost always need some of their money as well. You may be able to finance 90% of the deal but it is tough to finance all of it. There are also carrying costs, and financing costs while you own the property. The more money you borrow the more that money will cost you. We tend to need $50,000 or more per flip we do. If we have 10 flips going at once, that means we have at least $500,000 of our own cash tied up in those deals when we use loans. If we used all cash we would have $3,000,000 tied up in those ten deals!

It takes a lot of flips going at once to make $30,000 a month because it takes a while to flip a house.

How long does it take to flip a house?

I would love to say it takes three months to flip a house but in reality it takes much longer. We have a lot going at once so we cannot always start working on them right away. It may be a month or two before we can start the work, then it takes time to complete the work, and it takes time to sell the house once it is done as well.

Our fast flips take from 3 to 6 months to complete but may take from 6 to 10 months and a few take over a year from the time we buy them to the time we sell them. I would say our average has been around 8 months from beginning to end.

Because it takes so long to flip houses we need to have a lot of flips going at once to flip 10, 20 or even 26 houses a year which we have done a few times.

How many flips do you need going to make $30,000 a month?

If you want to make $30,000 a month flipping houses and you make $30,000 per flip that is pretty easy math. You need to flip 1 house a month or 12 houses a year. If it takes us from 6 to 10 months to flip a house that means you would need to have from 6 to 12 house flips going at once.

It took me many years to get the point where I could do that many flips, but we usually have from 15 to 20 flips going at one time and that equates to 20 to 26 flips a year selling.

Just remember this is all theory and reality can be much different! You might have some flips that lose money or take way longer than you think that drag down all of your averages. It may take more flips to make that goal or less if you manage to increase your profit margins.

If you decide to build a business like I have where you hire people to help you must factor in those costs as well. I have a project manager, bookkeeper, and other people who help with the flips as well. I also have many other things going on like this blog, my real estate brokerage, my rentals, and more!

If you want to see all of our flips in action be sure to subscribe to the InvestFourMore YouTube channel!

Source: investfourmore.com

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Homie’s Las Vegas, Nevada Housing Market Update October 2020

As the Las Vegas fall season comes around, the Las Vegas market keeps on going up. Read below for Homie’s update.

In October, the real estate market saw growth on most fronts including the number of listings, number of units sold, and in terms of median listing price and sales price. However, units available and availability went down year-over-year. With that said, we’re still seeing the market continue to grow month-over-month which might indicate that buyers and sellers are becoming more comfortable in the existing real estate market.

Here’s the full breakdown:

Monthly Sales

According to the data from the GLVAR® from October 2020, Las Vegas real estate realized a 6.8% increase in the number of single-family units sold compared to 2019. 

List Price

Average new list prices stay strong year over year as October records a 9% increase in new listing prices for single-family units and 8.8% increase for condo/townhouse units. 

*Data from the GLVAR® from October 2020 and October 2019

Sale Price

Property prices continued to grow as this seller market keeps on strong. We saw an 8.8% increase in year-over-year median price for single family units, and also a 14.3% increase in year-over-year median price for condos and townhouses.

*Data from the GLVAR® from October 2020 and October 2019

Days on Market (DOM)

We saw the Average Cumulative Days on Market continue to decrease in October 2020, as demand for this market continues to go strong. Now averaging an insanely brief 33 days on market versus 81 Average Cumulative Days on Market in 2019. This is a strong indicator that the real estate market will continue to remain strong. 

*Data from the GLVAR® from October 2020 and October 2019

Want to Know How Much Your Home’s Value?

Want to know how much your home is worth? Click here to request your home value report [https://www.homie.com/home-value-report]

Turn to a Homie

Homie has local real estate agents in all of our service areas. These agents are pros in everything they do, including understanding the local real estate market. Click to start selling or buying and to get in touch with your dedicated agent.

Call us at (702) 550-1081

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Or create an account with Homie

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Source: homie.com

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How Much Is Enough For Retirement?

April 20, 2019 Posted By: growth-rapidly Tag: Financial Advisor

If you’re thinking about how much is enough for retirement, you’re probably contemplating a retirement and need to know how to pay for it. If you are, that’s good because one of the challenges we face is how we’re going to fund our retirement.

Determining then how much retirement savings is enough depends on a number of factors, including your lifestyle and your current income. Either way, you want to make sure that you have plenty of money in your retirement savings so you don’t work too hard, or work at all, during your golden years.

If you’re already thinking about retirement and you’re not sure whether your savings is in good shape, it may make sense to speak with a financial advisor to help you set up a savings plan.

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How Much Is Enough For Retirement?

Your needs and expectations might be different in retirement than others. Because of that, there’s no magic number out there. In other words, how much is enough for retirement depends on a myriad of personal factors.

However, the conventional wisdom out there is that you should have $1 million to $1.5 million, or that your retirement savings should be 10 to 12 times your current income.

Even $1 million may not be enough to retire comfortably. According to a report from a major personal finance website, GoBankingRates, you could easily blow $1 million in as little as 12 years.

GoBankingRates concludes that a better way to figure out how long $1 million will last you largely depends on your state. For example, if you live in California, the report found, “$1 Million will last you 14 years, 3 months, 7 days.” Whereas if you live in Mississippi, “$1 Million will last you 23 years, 2 months, 2 days.” In other words, how much is enough for retirement largely depends on the state you reside.

For some, coming up with that much money to retire comfortably can be scary, especially if you haven’t saved any money for retirement, or, if your savings is not where it’s supposed to be.

Related topics:

How to Become a 401(k) Millionaire

Early Retirement: 7 Steps to Retire Early

5 Reasons Why You Will Retire Broke

Your current lifestyle and expected lifestyle?

What is your current lifestyle? To determine how much you need to save for retirement, you should determine how much your expenses are currently now and whether you intend to keep the current lifestyle during retirement.

So, if you’re making $110,000 and live off of $90,000, then multiply $90,000 by 20 ($1,800,000). With that number in mind, start working toward a retirement saving goals. However, if you intend to eat and spend lavishly during retirement, then you’ll obviously have to save more. And the same is true if you intend to reduce your expenses during retirement: you can save less money now.

The best way to start saving for retirement is to contribute to a tax-advantaged retirement account. It can be a Roth IRA, a traditional IRA or a 401(k) account. A 401k account should be your best choice, because the amount you can contribute every year is much more than a Roth IRA and traditional IRA.

1. See if you can max out your 401k. If you’re lucky enough to have a 401k plan at your job, you should contribute to it or max it out if you’re able to. The contribution limit for a 401k plan if you’re under 50 years old is $19,000 in 2019. If you’re funding a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA, the limit is $6,000. For more information, see How to Become a 401(k) Millionaire.

2. Automate your retirement savings. If you’re contributing to an employer 401k plan, that money automatically gets deducted from your paycheck. But if you’re funding a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA, you have to do it yourself. So set up an automatic deposit for your retirement account from a savings account. If your employer offers direct deposit, you can have a portion of your paycheck deposited directly into that savings account.

Related: The Best 5 Places For Your Savings Account.

Life expectancy

How long do you expect to live? Have your parents or grandparents lived through 80’s or 90’s or 100’s? If so, there is a chance you might live longer in retirement if you’re in good health. Therefore, you need to adjust your savings goal higher.

Consider seeking financial advice.

Saving money for retirement may not be your strong suit. Therefore, you may need to work with a financial advisor to boost your retirement income. For example, if you have a lot of money sitting in your retirement savings account, a financial advisor can help with investment options.

Bottom Line:

Figuring out how much is enough for retirement depends on how much retirement will cost you and what lifestyle you intend to have. Once you know the answer to these two questions, you can start working towards your savings goal.

How much money you will need in retirement? Use this retirement calculator below to determine whether you are on tract and determine how much you’ll need to save a month.

More on retirement:

Working With The Right Financial Advisor

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

Source: growthrapidly.com

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