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Homie’s Las Vegas, Nevada Housing Market Update October 2020

As the Las Vegas fall season comes around, the Las Vegas market keeps on going up. Read below for Homie’s update.

In October, the real estate market saw growth on most fronts including the number of listings, number of units sold, and in terms of median listing price and sales price. However, units available and availability went down year-over-year. With that said, we’re still seeing the market continue to grow month-over-month which might indicate that buyers and sellers are becoming more comfortable in the existing real estate market.

Here’s the full breakdown:

Monthly Sales

According to the data from the GLVAR® from October 2020, Las Vegas real estate realized a 6.8% increase in the number of single-family units sold compared to 2019. 

List Price

Average new list prices stay strong year over year as October records a 9% increase in new listing prices for single-family units and 8.8% increase for condo/townhouse units. 

*Data from the GLVAR® from October 2020 and October 2019

Sale Price

Property prices continued to grow as this seller market keeps on strong. We saw an 8.8% increase in year-over-year median price for single family units, and also a 14.3% increase in year-over-year median price for condos and townhouses.

*Data from the GLVAR® from October 2020 and October 2019

Days on Market (DOM)

We saw the Average Cumulative Days on Market continue to decrease in October 2020, as demand for this market continues to go strong. Now averaging an insanely brief 33 days on market versus 81 Average Cumulative Days on Market in 2019. This is a strong indicator that the real estate market will continue to remain strong. 

*Data from the GLVAR® from October 2020 and October 2019

Want to Know How Much Your Home’s Value?

Want to know how much your home is worth? Click here to request your home value report [https://www.homie.com/home-value-report]

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Source: homie.com

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How Long Does It Take to Close On A House?

In this article:

The closing process on a home purchase can take anywhere from a week to 60 days, depending on the property type, whether or not you’re buying with a mortgage and what type of loan you’re taking out. The closing process includes two distinct periods:

Escrow is the period of time between when you and the seller sign the contract and the day you close.

Closing day is the day you sign all the paperwork, get the keys and become the official owner of a home.

How long does it take to close on a house with cash?

Part of what makes closings take so long is the financing requirements, so buying with cash can expedite the process. If you’re buying with cash, you can close as few as seven days after contract execution, assuming you’re willing to waive contingencies. However, only 23% of buyers purchase their homes with all cash, according to the Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report 2018.

How long does it take to close on a house with a mortgage?

Buyers who use conventional financing to purchase a home can expect to close 30-45 days after the contract is signed. Special loans, such as first-time home buyer programs, VA and FHA loans can take longer to close because the requirements are stricter.

The escrow process timeline

After you’ve made an offer on a home and both you and the seller have agreed on terms (including price and closing date) and executed the contract, you’re officially in escrow. These are the steps that are usually part of the escrow process, and how long each step typically takes. Keep in mind that the escrow process and timeline can vary based on your market, lender, property type, financing type and the overall complexity of the transaction. You should also note that some of the steps below happen concurrently.

  1. Execute the contract and confirm closing date
  2. Open the escrow account (a few days)
  3. Complete inspection and repair requests (1-2 weeks)
  4. Mortgage application and underwriting (5-20 days)
  5. Appraisal (1-2 weeks)
  6. Acquire homeowner’s insurance and title insurance (1 day)
  7. Get loan approval, commonly called “Clear to close” (1 day)
  8. Do a final walk through (1 day)
  9. Attend your closing appointment and close on your new home (1 days)

According to Zillow Consumer Housing Trends Report 2019, 57% of buyers who attained a mortgage said one of their concerns was being unclear on how the mortgage process works. To make sure you fully understand the steps, stay in close contact with your real estate agent, real estate attorney (if you have/need one) and lender. They’ll be able to answer any questions you have and provide documents you need to sign, so be available to turn those requests around as quickly as possible.

The process of buying a house with cash

If you’re buying a home with all cash and still including common contingencies (like a home inspection contingency), your process will be the same, except you won’t have to do a mortgage application or wait for loan underwriting and approval. Some cash buyers opt to waive contingencies, which can speed up the process.

How long after the appraisal can you close?

Assuming there are no issues with your appraisal, the lender will send the “clear to close” about a week before the agreed-upon closing date. If you’ve requested a longer escrow period and a later closing date, you may get your “clear to close” well in advance of your closing date.

What causes delays when closing on a house?

Your closing date will usually be agreed upon with the seller during offer negotiations. But, your closing date could get pushed back a few days (or even a few weeks) based on unexpected setbacks. Here are some of the common issues that can lead to a delayed closing.

Buyer financing

Most of the time, delayed closings are related to finalizing your mortgage. This can be anything from appraisal concerns to missing financial documentation to an inexperienced loan officer.

Changes to your creditworthiness

If you’ve made large purchases, taken out another loan that negatively impacted your debt-to-income ratio or had a significant change in your income between the time you were pre-approved and closing, your lender may need to re-evaluate your credit profile, which can take time.

Low appraisal

If your appraisal comes in at or above the contracted sale price, it should be smooth sailing. But, a low appraisal could leave you needing to renegotiate with the seller or come up with enough cash to cover the difference between the home’s appraised value and the sale price.

Title issues

If the seller has any unresolved liens or judgments on the home, or if any other ownership disputes are uncovered during the escrow process, the closing can be delayed while these issues are resolved.

Homeowner’s insurance

In order to close, you must have proof that you’ve secured a homeowner’s insurance policy on the property you’re buying. If you miss this step or don’t have the correct documentation, your closing could be delayed.

Home sale contingency

If your contract says you can’t close until your previous home sells, your closing could be delayed if it takes longer than expected.

Slow repair requests

If you’re going back and forth with the seller on repairs needed based on the home inspection report, both the negotiations and the repairs themselves can slow down your closing timeline.

Unsatisfactory walk-through

Right before closing, you’ll do a final walk-through of the property. If the home isn’t in the same condition (or a better condition, if you negotiated repairs) than when you made your offer, you may delay closing until issues can be resolved.

Tips for staying on your closing timeline

Even if you’re buying with a mortgage (and you’ll be among the 77% of all buyers who are), you can help expedite the closing process by being prepared, responsive, diligent and decisive both before and during the escrow period.

Get pre-approved

Before you even start searching for homes, take the time to get pre-approved so you’ll know ahead of time that you’re eligible for a loan in the amount you need. Not only will it help you prevent delays during the escrow period, but it will make any offers you submit look more legitimate in the eyes of sellers, since they know you can pay for the home.

For a pre-approval, you’ll need documents that verify your income, like paystubs, bank statements and tax returns. You’ll also want to make sure your credit report is error free, as your lender will run your credit as part of your pre-approval.

Schedule the inspection as soon as possible

As soon as your offer is accepted and the contract is executed, schedule your home inspection. In some states, you are required to schedule the inspection within 7-10 days. After you receive the inspection report, you will have a few days to review and request repairs or credits from the seller. Keep in mind, the seller will have a few days to respond as well.

Buyers of Zillow-owned homes can have peace of mind that the home has been recently updated by licensed contractors. Of course, you’re still able to do your own independent home inspection.

Have a backup plan in case of a low appraisal

Appraisal reports can vary, and very rarely do two professional appraisers value a home exactly the same. If the home you’re buying appraises for less than the sale price, your lender won’t let you finance the home using the full sale price. If your appraisal comes back low, you have two options: either make up the difference in cash, or renegotiate the sale price with the seller. If you’re in a hot market where sellers have their pick of multiple offers, you shouldn’t expect the seller to lower their price to accommodate a low appraisal.

Hire an experienced lender

Find an experienced lender that is familiar with the intricacies and requirements of your market for a seamless and transparent closing process. Opt for an online lender to further optimize your experience. In fact, 15% of buyers who used a mortgage to finance a home in 2019 obtained their mortgage through an online lender. Though, younger buyers are more likely to choose an online lender option.

Be quick to respond to documentation requests

It’s likely that your lender will need updated financial documents, signed disclosures and other information as they prepare your loan for closing. Your title or escrow company may need you to complete certain tasks, too. Respond to all requests as quickly as possible to keep the escrow process moving forward.

How long does closing day take?

Closing day — that is, the day you go to the closing agent and sign your final paperwork to buy the home — typically takes between 1.5-2 hours if everything goes smoothly, but you’ll want to leave ample time in your schedule in case it takes longer.

During your closing appointment you’ll sign documents (a list of typical documents is below) and pay your down payment. Your lender will also wire the balance of the sale price at this time. The title or escrow agent will facilitate the closing appointment, but you’ll want your agent and/or attorney to be present as well. In closing attorney states, the attorney may facilitate the closing appointment. Be sure to bring your ID, a cashier’s check, proof of insurance and your purchase and sale contract.

Buyers usually must attend this meeting in person, whereas sellers can sometimes sign their paperwork ahead of time.

What documents do buyers usually sign?

  • Promissory note
  • Mortgage/deed of trust
  • Escrow disclosure
  • Signature affidavit
  • Initial mortgage payment
  • Appraisal acknowledgement
  • HOA documents (if applicable)
  • Certificate of occupancy (new construction only)
  • Equal Credit Opportunity Act disclosure
  • Truth-in-Lending disclosure
  • Mortgage fraud statements

Source: zillow.com

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Documents You Need to Apply for a Mortgage – Lexington Law

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Any application for credit should be taken as a serious matter. Simply applying and allowing the lender to pull your credit report has an impact on your credit score, so it’s not a good idea to apply for things on a whim. But mortgage applications tend to be more serious than most other apps because they’re for such large amounts of money and longer terms.

When you’re borrowing hundreds of thousands of dollars for 15 to 30 years, the lender wants to ensure you’re a sound investment. They actually have an obligation to their shareholders, employees and other customers to try to take on mortgage accounts that are likely to result in a return instead of a loss.

For these reasons, you usually have to show up to the mortgage application process with a lot of documentation. Here’s a rundown of the documents needed for a mortgage application.

Mortgage Application

The first document is the mortgage application itself. Whether you complete it online or as a physical piece of paper at a broker’s office or bank, this is the document that launches the process.

Typically, mortgage applications require the same type of information. That includes:

  • What type of loan you want. You may need to check or click boxes to indicate whether you want a conventional loan, VA loan, FHA loan or other type of loan.
  • Why you need the loan. Is it a refinance or new purchase, and are you purchasing a single-unit home you plan to live in, a rental property or a business property?
  • The property itself. You must fill in the address and some other basic information about the property you want to buy.
  • Demographic information about the person or people borrowing the money, including name, address, phone number and Social Security number.
  • Employment history for all borrowers.
  • Income and assets for all borrowers.
  • Debts and other liabilities for all borrowers.

You’ll also need to sign various agreements and disclosures. That includes whether you have a bankruptcy or other issue in your financial history and an agreement that the creditor can pull your reports.

Assets

You can’t just list items like assets on your mortgage application, though. You also have to prove your statements with documents. Documents that prove your assets can include bank statements showing current cash balances, investment statements showing current values and life insurance policies. If you’re including gift funds in your assets, you’ll need letters or other documents demonstrating where the money came from.

Debts and Expenses

Most of the time, the mortgage company can see evidence of your debts and expenses on your credit report. If the underwriter has any questions or concerns during the approval process, they may reach out for additional information such as copies of credit card statements. This is especially true if you’ve recently paid down debt and that isn’t yet reflected on your credit report.

When it comes to debts, one of the major concerns is your debt-to-income ratio. If it’s too high, the lender is less likely to approve you. Calculate this ratio by adding up all your monthly debt payments along with the estimated mortgage payment and dividing it by your total monthly income.

For example, if you have a car payment of $400, credit card bills with monthly minimums of $200 and student loans of $500 a month, that’s $1,100 in debt. Add a $1,500 mortgage and you would have $2,600 in debt. If you make $7,000 a month, your debt-to-income ratio is 37 percent.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau notes that the preferred debt-to-income ratio for mortgage approval is 43 percent or less. This is because you can’t use all your income up on debt—you still need money for utilities, food, fuel, savings and other critical expenditures.

Income and Employment Verification

You do have to prove the income amounts you put on a mortgage application. Common ways of doing so are summarized below.

Tax Returns

Tax returns from the past few years can demonstrate that you make a certain amount per year and have done so consistently. If you’re planning to apply for a mortgage soon and don’t have copies of your tax returns, consider proactively ordering a free transcript from the IRS.

W-2s and Pay Stubs

Copies of W-2 forms or a handful of pay stubs from your employer are also good ways to demonstrate your income. Start saving your paycheck stubs if you think you’ll apply for a mortgage soon.

Additional Information (Self-Employed)

If you’re self-employed or have forms of income that aren’t from an employer, you’ll need documentation. Some options can include statements from checking accounts or payment systems that show money you received. You could also provide a profit and loss statement if you’re self-employed.

Credit History

While the lender can get most of what they need from your credit report, you may need to be available to answer questions. Specifically, be ready to explain any negative items on the report. It’s a good idea to get a copy of your credit report for yourself before you apply for a mortgage so you know what might come up.

Other Documents

  • Photo IDs, such as a driver’s license or passport
  • Your rental history if you don’t already own a home, especially if you want to use it as demonstration of your payment history
  • Divorce records to prove that certain debts are no longer yours or that you don’t have access to funds from a previous spouse
  • Foreclosure or bankruptcy records, if applicable
  • Documentation of residency status if you’re applying as a noncitizen

Who Do You Give These Documents to?

You give the documents as requested to a mortgage broker you’re working with or to an underwriter with the mortgage company. You might be asked more than once for some documents, especially if you go through a preapproval process.

During preapproval, the mortgage company evaluates you as a borrower in general and lets you know what amount, terms and interest you can qualify for. Once you move to buy a home, the mortgage must go through a final approval process, and someone may need to look at your documents again or request additional documents.

Start Preparing for a Mortgage Early

A lender might ask for documents and require that you respond in a certain amount of time or it will deny the application automatically. So, you don’t want to get caught searching for documents during the process. Prepare for a mortgage app early by gathering everything that you anticipate that you might need. Another way to boost your chances for mortgage approval is to check your credit and resolve any negative items you can.

You might also be able to take actions to positively impact your credit before you apply for a mortgage—especially if your report has mistakes on it. If you want to repair your credit before making a big financial move, contact Lexington Law to find out how we can help.


Reviewed by John Heath, Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Born and raised in Salt Lake City, John Heath earned his BA from the University of Utah and his Juris Doctor from Ohio Northern University. John has been the Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm since 2004. The firm focuses primarily on consumer credit report repair, but also practices family law, criminal law, general consumer litigation and collection defense on behalf of consumer debtors. John is admitted to practice law in Utah, Colorado, Washington D. C., Georgia, Texas and New York.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

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Wine Country towns you can actually afford

You love​ the Napa lifestyle. The Napa prices? Not so much. If your budget is more “house blend” than “rare vintage,” you might assume that you’re priced out of a life among the vineyards. Not so. We found four wine country towns where you can sip local vino on your patio without dropping a fortune on your house.

Median sales price: $296,500

Palisade, where the median sales price is under $300,000. Photo: njplantguru/Instagram

Like Traverse City, Palisade has a microclimate that allows the area to grow produce you wouldn’t think was possible in Colorado. Its most notable crop is wine grapes—the area is home to two-thirds of the state’s vineyard acres and a quarter of its wineries. Orchards, vineyards, tasting rooms, and wineries are everywhere in this small town, and they’re all full of local Chardonnay, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Sauvignon Blanc. At Varaison Vineyards and Winery, locals show up on Fire Pit Fridays for s’mores and wine tastings. Residents enjoy outdoorsy adventures at Mount Lincoln and Mount Garfield and weekend festivals like September’s Colorado Mountain Winefest.

With wineries are spread throughout town, locals are never far from one, regardless of their address or budget. Here, living near a winery doesn’t require a million-dollar bank account. The good life can be had with a median sales price of $296,500.

Interested? You can have your own view of the mountains from this tidy five-bedroom for sale in Palisade for $339,357.


Median sales price: $252,111

The view from this Walla Walla home is a wine lover’s dream.

When Italians started immigrating to Walla Walla in the late 1800s, they came with a gift: winemaking know-how. Unfortunately, it would take nearly 100 years to figure out how to make grapes survive the often-fickle weather here. Today, the area is knowns for its Cabernet Sauvignon, but you’ll also find plenty of vines producing Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc, and Malbec. There are more than 120 wineries in Walla Walla, including one owned by NFL star Drew Bledsoe and a mini-winery cluster on the grounds of the local airport.

Though locals take their wine seriously, the Walla Walla vibe is as light-hearted as its name. This is a city where one of the best restaurants is found in a gas station—Andrae’s Kitchen, run by acclaimed chef Andrae Bopp. And in the wineries around town, you’re likely to find winemakers mixing with patrons, or in the case of Julia Russell of Mansion Creek Cellars, teaching them flamenco moves.

Though still somewhat under the radar as a wine region, Walla Walla is getting more attention all the time. Get ahead of the crowd while the median sales price is a friendly $252,111.

Interested? This three-bedroom charmer is available now for $250,000 in Walla Walla.


Median sales price: $288,500

Overmountain Vineyards sits on a 70-acre parcel east of Tryon. Photo: pryorreggie/Instagram

This small town of 1,700 in the heart of North Carolina’s horse country has a well-deserved reputation as an oasis for the arts. Many artists, actors, and writers (including F. Scott Fitzgerald) have lived in this town near the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Locals and visitors love the galleries, independent bookstores, and restaurants along Trade Street, but the Tryon Foothills Wine Country has become an even bigger attraction. Protected from extreme weather by the mountains, the Tryon Foothills have the longest grape-growing season in the state. In fact, the area has been famous for its prime grape-growing conditions for well over a century. Today, the area produces a large variety of wine grapes, including  Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. At Mountain Brook Vineyard, grapes are harvested entirely by hand. And over at Overmountain Vineyards, a father-daughter team handcrafts French-style wine.

Interested? Even the address of this sunny two-bedroom in Tryon is right: it’s on Vineyard Road. And at $269,500, it’s less than the median price of $288,500.


Median listing price: $220,650

This home for sale in Traverse City comes with a vineyard.

The mountain-like dunes on the shores of Lake Michigan aren’t the only quirk of geography for Traverse City. Its location near the lake gives the city ideal conditions for producing cool-climate grapes, a feat not possible anywhere else in the region. Wine experts love the area’s Rieslings, and both Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are popular Traverse City varieties, too. And there’s more praise still for the natural beauty at the area’s 35 wineries, especially those on the panoramic Leelanau Peninsula. Whether you’re gazing over Grand Traverse Bay from Chateau Chantel or at the rolling fields of lavender of Brys Estate, the views pair perfectly with the wine.

Though Traverse City is a favorite among summer vacationers, it doesn’t shut down after the high season. Most wineries remain open year-round, and the arts and entertainment scene stays busy with galleries, events, and film screenings at the restored vintage State Theatre. With a median listing price of $220,650, you’d have room in your budget to explore it all.

Interested? You can find an adorable three-bedroom for sale in Traverse City for $229,900.


Ready to find the wine-country home of your dreams? See what’s available now on Trulia.

Source: trulia.com

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Start-Up Business Loan Options

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

It can cost a lot of money to start a business, and most individuals don’t have all the capital they need up front, so they turn to a lender for help. Start-up business loans are offered by financial institutions to help business owners with a new business’s costs. While they’re a great concept, start-up business loans can be quite challenging to acquire.

These loans are risky for lenders, so the approval process can be laborious. Luckily, there are many options to consider.

How Can You Fund Your Start-Up?

When it comes to finding a start-up, business owners have several options available to them.

SBA Microloans

The US Small Business Administration (SBA) has a microloan program that offers loans up to $50,000 for small businesses and not-for-profit childcare centers. The average microloan is $13,000.

The SBA provides funds to specially designated nonprofit community-based organizations that act as intermediary lenders. These intermediaries administer the microloan program for eligible business owners. Here’s a list of providers.

Each of these intermediary lenders has its own set of unique requirements for borrowers. Typically, the intermediary lender will require some collateral from the business owner for the loan. These microloans can be used for working capital, inventory, supplies, furniture or fixtures. Microloans can’t be used to pay existing debts or purchase real estate.

Business owners who apply for SBA microloan financing may be required to fulfill training or planning requirements before being considered for the loan. The microloan downside is the “micro” part: Funding may not be sufficient for all borrowers.

The repayment terms on the microloan will vary depending on factors such as the loan amount, the planned use of the funds and the small business owner’s needs. Generally, the interest rates range between eight and 13 percent. Additionally, the maximum repayment term allowed for an SBA microloan is six years.

Other Microlenders

There are nonprofit organizations that are microlenders for small business loans. These microlenders are generally considered an easier route than an SBA microloan, especially for individuals with questionable credit history. A nonprofit microlender usually focuses on offering loans to minority or traditionally disadvantaged small business owners. Additionally, they help out small businesses in communities that are struggling economically.

These microlenders offer good term rates and allow business owners to establish better credit. This can help the business owner get other types of financing later on.

Individuals may consider a nonprofit microlender for a variety of reasons:

  1. Because profit is not their objective, the loan terms are fair and don’t take advantage of people in difficult situations.
  2. In addition to financing, many microlenders offer free consulting and training, helping small business owners make the right decisions to build their credit.

Business Credit Cards

You have a credit card for your personal expenses, so why not for your business expenses? Business credit cards can be an alternative financing solution to start-up business loans. To qualify for a business credit card, the lender will typically look at your personal credit score and combined income (business and personal).

One of the main benefits of a business credit card is that it allows you to, right away, separate your business and personal finances. You will start establishing business credit, which will help you in the future with additional business financing. Additionally, many business credit cards have great sign-up bonuses or rewards, such as cash back.

Some owners may incorrectly assume that it’s a poor decision to rely on a credit card for business expenses. However, having and using a business credit card is much more common than you may realize. In a 2019 survey from the Federal Reserve Banks, it was revealed that 59 percent of small business applicants use credit cards to fund their business.

If your score or income is low, you may have to consider a secured business credit card. Secured credit cards often come with higher interest rates and higher fees, so whenever possible, you’ll want to opt for an unsecured credit card.

Even if you receive an unsecured credit card, a low credit score will mean your interest rates on the card are higher than average. That’s why it’s essential you try to improve your credit before applying for a business credit card.

Personal Funding

You can also consider personal funding options to start up your business. Some examples are personal loans, dipping into your savings or home equity or personal credit cards. However, you should understand the risk of using this type of financing for your business. You will want to do some realistic calculations and ensure the business will be able to stand on its own without relying on further personal funding down the road.

If you use a personal credit card for business expenses, make sure you make payments right away and watch your credit utilization ratio. You should be aware that mistakes can significantly destroy your personal credit score, which will have serious consequences.

If you have a good amount in your personal savings, using this money is smart because you won’t have to pay interest on it. However, you’re ultimately taking a high risk. If your business doesn’t do well for a while, you won’t have savings to tide you over. The same applies to borrowing against your home equity. It will likely be a cheap option, but it comes with a significant risk.

If you do choose to use personal funding to start your business, make sure you take steps to start establishing business credit as quickly as possible. This will allow you to leverage business credit to gain more financing in the future and make the transition from personal financing to business avenues.

Lastly, you may consider branching out and asking friends or family for money. Make sure not to apply too much pressure, and give them the option of declining. 

Grants

Both private foundations and government agencies offer small business grants. These can be quite difficult to get, but it’s worth trying, as it would essentially be free capital.

Grants are often offered for specific groups, such as grants for US veterans or female entrepreneurs.

Venture Capital Investments

If you believe your business idea has the potential for massive growth, you may consider pitching it to venture capitalists. A venture capital investment gives you money in exchange for an ownership share or active role in the company. These investors can be individuals or part of a venture capitalist firm

The benefit of a venture capital investment is that it’s not a loan, so you’re not acquiring debt. Instead, the third party offers capital in return for equity. However, this does mean a higher risk, as you may end up paying them out significantly more if your business yields high returns. You’re also often giving up some control of your company to the investor.

Crowdfunding

Platforms like KickStarter have made crowdfunding an easily accessible and valid option for individuals wanting to start a business. You typically share your business plan and objectives with a public forum and hope people make donations or backings to fund the project.

These campaigns take lots of marketing effort but can get significant funding if they’re successful.

Which Option Is Best for You?

It can be difficult to know which of these options is the right approach for your business. However, we’ve broken down how you can better identify which solution works for you:

  1. First, determine how much funding you’ll need to start. This number will automatically rule out some of the options.
  2. Next, determine your credit score—both your personal score and business score (if applicable). Once again, this may rule out some funding options if your credit score is too low. For your personal consumer credit scoring, consider credit repair services to work on your credit score so you have more funding options available to you in the future.
  3. Understand that some of the business funding options will require collateral. Complete an analysis of your assets and identify if you have any collateral to offer up.
  4. When you apply for most types of financing, you’ll be required to share certain documents. You can have these documents prepared ahead of time. Some of the most common documents needed are a business plan, a business forecast, a business credit report, a personal credit report, tax returns, applicable licenses and registrations and legal contracts, to name a few.
  5. It’s essential that you only borrow an amount you can repay. Sometimes, you’ll be approved for much more than you think you need. Avoid taking it just because it’s offered to you.

More than anything, applying for start-up business loans starts with your credit. You should know your credit score, identify whether it’s low and consider credit repair services if needed. Ultimately, the higher your credit score, the better rates and financing options you’ll receive. Lexington Law can help with all your credit needs, so get started today.


Reviewed by John Heath, Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Born and raised in Salt Lake City, John Heath earned his BA from the University of Utah and his Juris Doctor from Ohio Northern University. John has been the Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm since 2004. The firm focuses primarily on consumer credit report repair, but also practices family law, criminal law, general consumer litigation and collection defense on behalf of consumer debtors. John is admitted to practice law in Utah, Colorado, Washington D. C., Georgia, Texas and New York.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

How to Set a Home Renovation Budget

Before you start picking out tile and paint chips, be sure you know how much it will cost to remodel your house.

Have you just moved into a new place and want to spruce it up? Or maybe you’ve been in your home for a while and feel ready for a change. The easy part is knowing your goal for home remodeling — whether you’re trying to keep up with your growing family, add office space, modernize dated features or generally increase your home’s value.

Even if you’re ready for a kitchen renovation or anxious for a bathroom remodel, figuring out how to plan a home renovation that doesn’t break the bank can be tricky.

Here are five key steps in planning your home remodeling project.

1. Estimate home renovation costs

As a general rule of thumb, you should spend no more on each room than the value of that room as a percentage of your overall house value. (Get an approximate value of your home to start with.)

For example, a kitchen generally accounts for 10 to 15 percent of the property value, so spend no more than this on kitchen renovation costs. If your home is worth $200,000, for example, you’ll want to spend $30,000 or less.

Something else to keep in mind: Contrary to popular belief, kitchen renovations offer among the lowest return on investment. Every dollar you spend on a kitchen remodel increases the value of your home by approximately 50 cents.

The highest return on investment? A mid-range bathroom remodel.

2. Consider home remodeling loan options

If you plan on borrowing money to fund your home renovations, there are a number of loans out there to help with just that.

  • Refinancing. Depending on your current interest rate, you might be able to refinance your mortgage at a lower rate and/or for a longer loan term, which could lower your monthly payments and help you save up for your renovations.
  • Cash-out refinance. If you have enough equity, you could also consider a cash-out refinance, which means refinancing your existing loan for an amount that’s higher than what you owe. Going this route, you pay off your original mortgage and have cash left over. Use a refinance calculator to see if refinancing makes sense for you.
  • HELOC. If refinancing sounds like too big of a leap, a home equity line of credit (HELOC) might work better. A HELOC works a lot like a credit card in the sense that it has a set limit that you can borrow against.
  • Home equity loan. Although it sounds similar to a HELOC, a home equity loan is a bit different. This loan requires you to take out all the cash at one time. They’re often referred to as “second mortgages” because homeowners get them in addition to their first mortgage.

Refinancing, getting a HELOC or taking out a home equity loan are all big decisions, and it can be tough to know which one makes the most sense for you. As with any new loan, consult with a lender to see which option is best for your situation.

3. Get home renovation quotes from contractors

Some contractors will give you an estimate based on what they think you want done, and work completed under these circumstances is almost guaranteed to cost more. You have to be very specific about what you want done, and spell it out in the contract — right down to the materials you’d like used.

Get quotes from several contractors, but don’t necessarily go for the the lowest estimate. A bid that comes in much lower than the others could be a sign of a contractor who cuts corners — which can lead to extra costs in the long run.

4. Stick to the home remodeling plan

As the renovation moves along, you might be tempted to add on another “small” project or incorporate the newest design trend at the last minute. But know that every time you change your mind, there’s a change order, and even minor changes can be costly. Strive to stick to the original agreement, if possible.

5. Account for hidden home renovation costs

Your home may look perfect on the outside, but there could be issues lurking beneath the surface. In fact, hidden imperfections are one of the reasons renovation projects often end up costing more than anticipated.

Rather than scramble to come up with extra money after the fact, give yourself a cushion upfront. Factor in 10 to 20 percent (or more) of your contracted budget for unforeseen expenses, as they can — and do — occur. In fact, it’s rare that any project goes completely smoothly.

Related:

Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow.

Originally published June 2015.

Source: zillow.com

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Ways to Successfully Manage Your Credit Utilization Rate

Managing Credit UtilizationWhen you think of your credit score, you may not consider how this number is calculated or how your actions play a role. Simply put, every credit score is made up of certain criteria, and each criteria can cause an increase or decrease in credit score. With credit utilization being one of the things that can impact your score, it may be time to learn how to manage your credit utilization.

In order to successfully manage your credit utilization rate, you’ll need to understand what it is and how it can negatively or positively impact your life. 

What is credit utilization rate and how is it calculated?

Credit utilization rate is a number used to compare the amount of debt you owe to the amount of credit you have available. By dividing the amount of credit that you use by the amount of credit available, you can determine your credit utilization rate. The more of your available credit you use the higher your credit utilization rate.

For example, if you have several credit cards, one with a credit limit of $500, one with a credit limit of $200, and another with a credit limit of $300, your total available revolving credit amount is $1,000. If you use $400 of the $1,000 of available credit, your credit utilization rate will be 40%. Whereas if you were to use $100 of your available credit, your credit utilization rate would be 10%.

Why does your credit utilization rate matter?

Credit utilization is one of the many factors that can affect your credit score. It actually makes up 30% of your FICO credit score, which means it is one of the most important factors that influence your credit score. Depending on the number, creditors and lenders may or may not approve your application. This is because your credit utilization rate is another way for creditors and lenders to measure your ability to manage your finances.

If you have $2,000 of revolving credit available to you between one or multiple credit cards, in order to keep your credit utilization at or below 30%, you’ll want to use no more than $600 if you don’t want to see your credit score drop significantly.

Managing your credit utilization

Since your credit utilization rate accounts for 30% of your credit score, you want to pay close attention to this number to ensure it doesn’t start to negatively impact your score. This is especially true when you want to improve your score to increase your chances of being approved for things that require good credit such as applying for a home loan or apartment.

You can successfully manage your credit utilization rate by:

  • Increasing your credit card limit
  • Paying your credit balance in full instead of just the minimum balance
  • Keeping credit accounts open even when there is little to no use
  • Pay down debts
  • Actively monitor your credit usage

Keep in mind that the goal of managing your credit utilization rate is to keep it at 30% or less. This doesn’t mean that you have to completely stop accessing your revolving credit, but you want to do so responsibly if you don’t want to see your credit score suffer.

For credit repair assistance and financial advice, contact Credit Absolute today for a free consultation!

Source: creditabsolute.com

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Values of Distressed Manhattan Retail Properties Plummet

Real estate borrowers who are already struggling to pay the mortgages on their Manhattan retail properties have also been hit with a sharp cut to those properties’ assessed values. So reports MarketWatch.

The values for Manhattan retail properties for which lenders ordered new appraisals since July—often done when borrowers seek debt relief or fall behind on their payments—were down 53% from their value at the time of securitization, according to data from real-estate data platforms Trepp and CompStak.

Trepp and CompStak, which looked at $5 billion of Manhattan retail property debt, said that the lion’s share of those properties were in “the Chelsea/Clinton and Greenwich Village/SoHo neighborhoods.”

Read the full article from MarketWatch.

Source: themortgageleader.com

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How Much Home Insurance Do I Need? A Guide for Buyers

If you’re buying a home, choosing the right amount of homeowners insurance for your property is key. Buy too much, and you’re wasting cash on coverage you’ll never use.

Buy too little, and if a hurricane, hailstorm, or other disaster strikes your home, your insurance might not cover the costs to fix the damage—which means you’ll be paying out of your own pocket.

So how much home insurance is enough? In this latest installment of our Home Buyer’s Guide to Home Insurance, we’ll outline all you need to know to get the right amount and type of insurance to suit your circumstances perfectly.

How much homeowners insurance do I need?

The goal of your homeowner insurance policy is to ensure you’re covered not only for minor damage that you’d like financial help fixing, but more importantly, in case your home is completely destroyed (in a tornado, fire, or otherwise) and needs to be rebuilt from scratch. This is known as “actual total loss” or “total loss.”

Total loss coverage varies from area to area as well as from home to home, but basically boils down to an estimate of how much it would cost to rebuild your home. That could cost more than you paid for your house, or less—it all depends on construction costs in your area.

“Size, materials, quality of finish, and a number of other factors will influence that rebuilding cost,” says Stefan Tirschler, product and underwriting manager at Square One Insurance Services.

To determine the total loss coverage for your property, you’ll want to talk to a home insurance company or agent (who probably represents various insurance companies), who can determine the best amount of coverage based on your home’s square footage, the local construction market, and, of course, the current market value of the house.

“When you shop for home insurance, your insurance provider will likely have access to electronic reconstruction cost-estimating tools to help provide a sense of how much coverage you need,” Tirschler explains.

If you have a mortgage on your home, your lender will probably require your coverage to equal 100% of the replacement cost of the home. And even if your home is paid off—or no requirement is in place—it’s still a good idea to buy enough coverage to cover the complete replacement cost.

Even if the odds are slim that you’ll ever need to use it, the peace of mind it can provide in the event of a disaster is priceless.

Does home insurance cover what’s inside the house?

Another factor to consider is not only the replacement cost of your house, but what’s inside as well—in other words, your belongings. After all, if your home is destroyed by fire or damaged by a hurricane, it’s not just the roof and walls that take the hit.

Most home insurance policies will cover interior items, but that doesn’t mean everything inside your home is safe. For instance, a “named perils policy” typically covers only a specific, narrow list of causes of loss, and depending on why you place the claim, you may find your insurance company won’t pay up!

If you want to ensure your valuables are fully protected, Tirschler suggests looking for an insurance provider that offers an “open perils” (or “all-risk”) policy.

“Open perils policies provide the strongest protection, because they cover all possible causes of loss except for those that are specifically excluded,” he notes.

Is basic home insurance enough?

As you shop for home insurance and compare quotes, you should know that most insurance providers won’t give you just one quote—rather, they may offer several. This is because companies often offer different levels of insurance—like “basic” and “enhanced”—each with their own price, pros, and cons. Here are some factors to consider:

  • Deductible. A deductible is the amount you’ll need to pay out of pocket before your insurance kicks in. Generally speaking, the higher the deductible, the cheaper the monthly insurance premiums. Why? Because with a high deductible, you’ll have to pay more before your insurance company has to pitch in. Deductibles often range from $1,000 up to $5,000.
  • Coverage limits. A coverage limit is the maximum amount your insurer will pay when something goes wrong and you file a claim—everything above this amount, you’ll have to pay out of pocket. For instance, a more affordable, basic plan might pay the medical bills if a guest is injured at your house at up to $1,000 per person, whereas a more expensive, enhanced plan might cover up to $5,000 per person.

You can choose between these various insurance levels based on your personal comfort level, tolerance for risk, and how much money you have in the bank in case of emergencies.

If your circumstances or outlook change, most companies will allow you to increase or decrease your coverage. For instance, if you could only afford a basic, bare-bones plan originally but want pricier/better coverage after getting a promotion at work, most insurance companies will happily adjust your plan to suit your new circumstances.

Do you need additional home insurance riders?

Your insurer will also likely offer you some additional, optional coverage. Got expensive jewelry or artwork in your home? You may want to purchase additional coverage. You’ll pay more now, but if your valuables are damaged or destroyed, your insurance company will help you pay to replace them, which could save you money in the long run.

“If you have any high-value items, such as jewelry or expensive art, these will require a different policy to truly cover their actual worth,” says Ralph DiBugnara, president of Home Qualified.

Remember, too, that you may need to purchase a separate insurance policy for things that are not covered in your plan. For instance, floods and earthquakes are typically not covered in basic insurance plans, so if you want it, you’ll have to buy this insurance separately.

In our next installment of this series, we’ll dive in more depth into what home insurance covers—and what it doesn’t.

Source: realtor.com

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What to Look for When Buying a House

In this article:

While everybody knows that buyers shop based on price range, there are many additional considerations to make when looking for a home. And, most buyers end up refining their criteria once they start touring homes. Ultimately, your home criteria should depend on your personal lifestyle and needs. Regardless of what you’re looking for, here are some general rules you should follow to make sure you’ll be happy with the home you buy for the foreseeable future.

What are the top features buyers look for in a home?

Today’s buyers are juggling many different priorities when it comes to buying a home, but according to the Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report 2019, here are the features that rank as very important or extremely important to most buyers.

Neighborhood wants and needs for buyers

  • Safety: 82% say a neighborhood that feels safe is very or extremely important
  • Walkability: 60% say it’s very or extremely important
  • Preferred neighborhood: 56% say it’s very or extremely important
  • Proximity to shopping, services and/or leisure activities: 53% say it’s very or extremely important
  • Optimal commute to work or school: 52% say it’s very or extremely important
  • Offers a sense of community or belonging: 48% say it’s very or extremely important
  • Close to family and friends: 46% say it’s very or extremely important
  • In preferred school district: 43% say it’s very or extremely important

Home features buyers want

  • Within initial budget: 83% say it’s very or extremely important
  • Air conditioning: 78% of buyers say it’s very or extremely important
  • Preferred number of bedrooms: 76% of buyers say it’s very or extremely important
  • Preferred number of bathrooms: 67% of buyers say it’s very or extremely important
  • Private outdoor space: 67% of buyers say it’s very or extremely important
  • Preferred size/square footage: 67% of buyers say it’s very or extremely important
  • Floor plan/layout that fits preferences: 67% of buyers say it’s very or extremely important

28% of buyers look for a home to rent out, 27% looked for smart homes, 58% of buyers looked for assigned parking

1. Search for the right price

Price will ultimately dictate what you can or cannot buy. While looking at homes above your price range can be fun, it’s not a good use of time — and it can lead to heartbreak when you realize it’s not financially feasible. Despite this, Zillow research found that in 2019, just 55% of buyers stayed on budget, while 26% went over their initial budget.

How to set your home buying budget

Use Zillow’s Affordability Calculator: This handy tool gives you an initial budget range based on your income, existing monthly bills, and down payment amount. Once you have that range, you can set up Zillow alerts for homes on the market that fit your price range, along with other criteria.

Get pre-approved: Once you’re ready to really start your home search, you’ll want to get pre-approved by the lender of your choice. They’ll approve you for a loan up to a specific amount, based on your income, debt and credit history.

Forecast your mortgage payment: Even if you are pre-approved for a large loan from your lender, you should make sure you’re comfortable with your estimated monthly housing payment. When you use Zillow’s mortgage calculator to estimate your monthly payments, be sure the taxes, insurance, and HOA fees are accurate — those items can make a big difference in your monthly costs.

2. Prioritize the location

Next to budget, location is one of the most important things to consider when buying a house. The 2019 report uncovered that 24% of buyers found it difficult or extremely difficult to find a home in their desired location. If you can’t find or afford a home in your ideal neighborhood, you’ll want to ask yourself a few questions (and enlist the help of your agent) to find a location that fits your lifestyle, needs and budget. Remember — your home’s location can’t be changed, so take the time to really identify a neighborhood where you’ll be happy live.

Proximity to downtown

Unsurprisingly, homes closer to core downtown areas have better resale value, thanks to their shorter commutes. According to Zillow research, in 29 of the country’s 33 largest metro areas included in the analysis, buyers should expect to pay more per square foot for a home within a 15-minute rush-hour drive to the downtown core. That may be why 15% of buyers who compromise to stay within their budget add time to their commute.

Community attributes

If you like being able to walk to restaurants and shops, try walking the distance to town to see if it’s doable. Spend some time exploring the area, checking out nearby parks and figuring out what kinds of attractions are nearby.

Alternatively, if you’re someone who likes a more solitary life and doesn’t mind driving, you might prioritize a home that offers more privacy, perhaps in a location that’s off the beaten path.

School district quality

If you have kids (or are planning on having kids in the future), you want them to get the best education possible. Checking out the school district ratings is a starting point, but you should visit the local schools to gather your assessment of the education and programs. Even if you don’t have children, the school district that your home is in can impact your future resale value.

Flood zone status

Homes located in flood zones require additional insurance, and buying a home in a flood-prone area means you need to be prepared if a flood actually happens.

3. Think long term

According to the Zillow Group Report, the typical homeowner stays in their home for 14 years before selling. When shopping for a home, don’t just think of your immediate needs. Make sure the home you select will meet your long-term goals, so you won’t have to move again in the near future.

Bedrooms and bathrooms

If you plan to expand your family in the near future, make sure the new home can accommodate your plans, whether it’s an extra room for a new baby, an in-law suite for parents, or a guest bedroom if you’re moving out of state and anticipate lots of visitors. The same goes if you are planning to downsize or you have grown children who will be moving out soon.

Outdoor space

As mentioned above, most buyers rank outdoor space as important. If you have a dog (or plan to get one), have kids who need a safe place to play or are an avid gardener, you’ll want to make sure the home’s outdoor space meets your needs.

Potential to personalize

Many buyers look for a home that’s move-in ready, so they can avoid costly repairs and updates (especially right after moving in). But at the same time, it’s nice to be able to add some personal flair to make a house feel like home. If you’d like to add some of your own style, be sure to steer clear of homes that you won’t be able to change enough to fit your preferences.

Lifestyle amenities

Ideally, your new home should enhance your current lifestyle — and you’ve probably already envisioned what your life in a new home will look like. As you evaluate houses, consider your hobbies and what makes you happy. For example, if you love spending time outdoors, you probably want a home with a nice yard. If you love to cook, maybe a nice, big kitchen is on your wish list. And, think about your current living situation: What things do you wish were different?

4. Assess property condition

TV makes home renovations look easy, but in reality, they’re anything but. If you’re a first-time buyer who has never undergone a renovation, you may want to steer clear of a home in serious disrepair. The costs can add up quickly, and if the home needs structural work, it could delay your move-in, causing unnecessary stress. Here are the three major categories of property condition.

Move-in ready

A move-in ready home is new, close to new, or has been recently renovated. Zillow-owned homes are move-in ready homes that have been recently renovated by a licensed contractor, and are ready for new owners to start their lives.

Minor updates

A home that needs minor updates might have cosmetic issues you’d like to change, or have some dated mechanical systems that could be updated for energy savings. Learn more about minor cosmetic details below.

Major renovation

A home that needs major repairs is usually priced lower due to the work that needs to be done. One upside to a major renovation is the opportunity to personalize the home to your tastes. Keep in mind that the return on investment for a major renovation isn’t 100%, and you risk a delayed move-in if the repairs are more extensive than anticipated.

Check condition of costly systems

No matter the condition of the home you’re buying, make sure your inspector checks to make sure major systems and mechanicals in the home are functioning properly. If issues are uncovered, you’ll want to ask the seller to either repair them before closing or offer a credit so you can fix them yourself. Look out for the following costly issues:

  • Damaged roof
  • Older furnace or HVAC system
  • Flooding, water damage or mold
  • Old insulation
  • Plumbing issues
  • Exterior cracks
  • Uneven floors

5. Don’t focus on minor cosmetic details

No house is perfect, so try not to get hung up on little imperfections. For example, don’t eliminate a home from your list just because you don’t like the interior paint color. Cosmetic changes are fairly easy and affordable to make. Don’t let the following minor issues keep you from buying a house you would otherwise love:

  • Paint
  • Hardware
  • Furnishings
  • Landscaping

When you attend showings and open houses, or even when you’re just browsing through pictures online, it’s easy to get distracted by clutter. Try not to pay too much attention to the seller’s stuff — it’ll all be removed by the time you move in. Put in the effort to picture the house as a blank canvas for all of your belongings.

6. Stick with your must-haves

There’s a big difference between wants and needs, so create two different lists when searching for a home. For instance, a shorter commute may be a must-have, but smart home features are a nice-to-have. Practicality and functionality should always take priority over the bells and whistles.

Things to consider when buying a house: needs vs. wants

For example, your list of needs might look like this.

  • Need: shorter commute
  • Need: specific number of bedrooms and bathrooms
  • Need: parking

Other items might fall to your list of wants, like these.

  • Want: updated kitchen
  • Want: upstairs washer and dryer
  • Want: smart home features

Source: zillow.com

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