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Can Adding a Pool Increase Your Home Value?

On scorching hot days, there’s nothing like taking a dip in a swimming pool. In some areas of the country, a swimming pool is close to a necessity. In fact, there are 10.6 million swimming pools across the U.S., with 3,000,000 of those in California alone. From in-ground to above-ground, chlorine to saltwater, there are numerous styles, sizes, and prices of swimming pools. And while having a swimming pool just steps from your back door may sound appealing, is it really a good economical choice and does it increase your home’s value? There are a lot of factors to consider before adding a swimming pool, or even before buying a home with an existing swimming pool.

installing a pool at homeinstalling a pool at home

The Cost To Install

While having a pool sounds like a great way to be the life of the party when hosting friends and family during warm months, it can be pricey. And as with most large purchases many people finance the addition. The average cost to build an inground swimming pool is $35,000, with most spending between $28,000 to $55,000 for the initial investment. Of course, the amount of site work, soil type, and additional finishes can greatly impact the cost of a swimming pool. For many, the equivalent of a new car is worth the enjoyment a swimming pool would bring.

The Cost To Maintain

The costs associated with maintaining a swimming vary based on location, size, and type. According to Michelle Sbabo, co-owner of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa, homeowners can “expect to spend a minimum of $500 per summer on chemicals and supplies – plus at least a couple of hours a week testing water, adjusting chemicals, brushing, vacuuming, cleaning filters, netting, and emptying skimmer and filter baskets.” Depending on the type of swimming pool, average annual maintenance costs can vary from $375 to over $2,750. When choosing the type of swimming pool, it’s important to inquire with a local pool maintenance company what to reasonably expect in annual maintenance costs.

Read: Tips for Selecting Above-ground Pool Equipment

The Cost To Open and Close A Pool

For some parts of the country, swimming pools can remain open year-round; however, in colder climates, homeowners must close swimming pools to prevent damage from cold weather. According to Sbabo, “Closing a pool will run $200-300 for a standard pool, more with complex equipment and plumbing. Opening a pool is roughly the same cost as closing – unless the pool is extremely green or dirty and requires more time and chemicals to clean up.”

pool at housepool at house

How Your Geographic Location Affects Your Investment

Michelle Sbabo of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa also explains that “The contents of source water also affect pool water care. In many parts of the country, for example, the water is very high in calcium and other minerals. This can cause scaling on pool surfaces and inside equipment, and water must be treated appropriately to minimize scale damage. Additionally, weather and environment greatly impact pool care. Pools in areas with a lot of rain or wind may need a greater range of chemicals to address contaminants that enter the pool. And certain plants and trees can cause maintenance issues.”

Read: Tips for Landscaping Around a Pool

How A Swimming Pool Affects Homeowner’s Insurance

Once a swimming pool is on a property, the chance for injury or death increases which is why homeowner’s insurance increases with a pool. According to Zack’s Investment Research, insurance companies typically require an increased liability coverage, sometimes up to half a million dollars, and some even encourage additional umbrella policies. There are ways to keep premiums at a reasonable rate by installing a locking gate around the pool, keeping the pool covered with a safety tarp, adding motion sensors to the pool, and even cameras surrounding the pool.

…But Will A Pool Add To Your Home’s Value?

One of the important things to remember: swimming pools aren’t for everyone. So just by the mere fact that a pool is on the property, there will be a group of potential home buyers that will not be interested. However, the bottom-line answer is: it depends. For some geographic areas (like Southern Florida or California), a swimming pool can certainly increase appeal- and value. However, in areas like Michigan or Northern states, they may have less desirability and the pool could appraise for less than the install price. However, a recent study by LendingTree shows that homes with a pool are valued at 54% higher than those without one.

Tips From The Expert

Michelle Sbabo, co-owner of Northwest Arkansas Pool and Spa offers a few tips for those thinking of adding a pool or buying a home with an existing pool.

  • Most home inspections don’t include the pool. If the buyer is new to pools, it’s a good idea to hire a pool pro to check the equipment and understand any potential expenses.
  • Contact a local pool maintenance company to teach you how to care for a pool. Many new pool owners greatly benefit from a “private pool lesson”.
  • Check into a Home Warranty that covers pool equipment. We have seen major equipment expenses covered by good warranty programs with only a small deductible out of pocket.


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Jennifer is an accidental house flipper turned Realtor and real estate investor. She is the voice behind the blog, Bachelorette Pad Flip. Over five years, Jennifer paid off $70,000 in student loan debt through real estate investing. She’s passionate about the power of real estate. She’s also passionate about southern cooking, good architecture, and thrift store treasure hunting. She calls Northwest Arkansas home with her cat Smokey, but she has a deep love affair with South Florida.

Source: homes.com

The ABCs of Multifamily Cash Flow

You hear the term all the time. After all, it’s an essential concept for apartment investors because it not only reflects the viability of your investment but also its value. 

But what really is cash flow? How do you compute it, and more importantly, how can you increase the cash flow of your multifamily property?

Cash flow is simply the money that moves in and out of your business. For apartments, the cash coming in is in the form of rent, and the cash flowing out is in the form of expenditures like property taxes and utilities. 

Cash flow – or lack of it — is one of the primary reasons businesses, or real estate investments,  fail. Without sufficient cash flow, you’ll run out of money. That’s why it’s essential that you have sufficient capital to not only purchase an apartment property but also sustain it in the event that cash flow fails to be what you projected – for example, if units turn over more often than you expect or rents decline. 

Here are some ways you can improve the cash flow of your apartment investment:

  • Increase rents. This is perhaps the fastest and easiest way to improve cash flow. Consider repositioning the property – investing some capital to improve the units and then bumping rents.
  • Reduce utility costs. Fix leaky shower heads and faucets, which waste water. Install energy-efficient appliances and lighting fixtures. 
  • Decrease expenses. Renegotiate your property management contract, or put it out to bid at the end of the term. Use free rental property listing sites rather than paying a broker to rent apartments.
  • Encourage residents to stay. Moveouts are expensive, so when tenants renew their leases you’ll save time and money on prepping the unit.
  • Add additional streams of revenue, such as pet deposits and rent, garage rentals, vending machines or valet trash. 

Source: century21.com

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Why Refinance Rates Are Higher Than Purchase Loan Rates

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How to Set a Home Renovation Budget

Before you start picking out tile and paint chips, be sure you know how much it will cost to remodel your house.

Have you just moved into a new place and want to spruce it up? Or maybe you’ve been in your home for a while and feel ready for a change. The easy part is knowing your goal for home remodeling — whether you’re trying to keep up with your growing family, add office space, modernize dated features or generally increase your home’s value.

Even if you’re ready for a kitchen renovation or anxious for a bathroom remodel, figuring out how to plan a home renovation that doesn’t break the bank can be tricky.

Here are five key steps in planning your home remodeling project.

1. Estimate home renovation costs

As a general rule of thumb, you should spend no more on each room than the value of that room as a percentage of your overall house value. (Get an approximate value of your home to start with.)

For example, a kitchen generally accounts for 10 to 15 percent of the property value, so spend no more than this on kitchen renovation costs. If your home is worth $200,000, for example, you’ll want to spend $30,000 or less.

Something else to keep in mind: Contrary to popular belief, kitchen renovations offer among the lowest return on investment. Every dollar you spend on a kitchen remodel increases the value of your home by approximately 50 cents.

The highest return on investment? A mid-range bathroom remodel.

2. Consider home remodeling loan options

If you plan on borrowing money to fund your home renovations, there are a number of loans out there to help with just that.

  • Refinancing. Depending on your current interest rate, you might be able to refinance your mortgage at a lower rate and/or for a longer loan term, which could lower your monthly payments and help you save up for your renovations.
  • Cash-out refinance. If you have enough equity, you could also consider a cash-out refinance, which means refinancing your existing loan for an amount that’s higher than what you owe. Going this route, you pay off your original mortgage and have cash left over. Use a refinance calculator to see if refinancing makes sense for you.
  • HELOC. If refinancing sounds like too big of a leap, a home equity line of credit (HELOC) might work better. A HELOC works a lot like a credit card in the sense that it has a set limit that you can borrow against.
  • Home equity loan. Although it sounds similar to a HELOC, a home equity loan is a bit different. This loan requires you to take out all the cash at one time. They’re often referred to as “second mortgages” because homeowners get them in addition to their first mortgage.

Refinancing, getting a HELOC or taking out a home equity loan are all big decisions, and it can be tough to know which one makes the most sense for you. As with any new loan, consult with a lender to see which option is best for your situation.

3. Get home renovation quotes from contractors

Some contractors will give you an estimate based on what they think you want done, and work completed under these circumstances is almost guaranteed to cost more. You have to be very specific about what you want done, and spell it out in the contract — right down to the materials you’d like used.

Get quotes from several contractors, but don’t necessarily go for the the lowest estimate. A bid that comes in much lower than the others could be a sign of a contractor who cuts corners — which can lead to extra costs in the long run.

4. Stick to the home remodeling plan

As the renovation moves along, you might be tempted to add on another “small” project or incorporate the newest design trend at the last minute. But know that every time you change your mind, there’s a change order, and even minor changes can be costly. Strive to stick to the original agreement, if possible.

5. Account for hidden home renovation costs

Your home may look perfect on the outside, but there could be issues lurking beneath the surface. In fact, hidden imperfections are one of the reasons renovation projects often end up costing more than anticipated.

Rather than scramble to come up with extra money after the fact, give yourself a cushion upfront. Factor in 10 to 20 percent (or more) of your contracted budget for unforeseen expenses, as they can — and do — occur. In fact, it’s rare that any project goes completely smoothly.

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Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow.

Originally published June 2015.

Source: zillow.com

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